Author Interview with Debbie Manber Kupfer

I introduce to you the author of “P.A.W.S.” and “Argentum.”

Copyright © Debbie Manber Kupfer
Copyright © Debbie Manber Kupfer

1. What genre are your books?

My main series is YA fantasy, but I also write puzzles for magazines and dabble in different genres in short stories.

2. What draws you to this genre?

Fantasy is my absolute favorite genre to read. Also with magic you can go anywhere, do anything – I like that.

3. What project are you working on at the moment?

I’m currently working on two projects. The first is book 3 of my P.A.W.S. series, which is tentatively called Maze of Shadows. The second project is a book of logic puzzles, Paws4Logic, that should be released in a month or so.

4. What’s it about?

Miri’s journey takes her to Israel to discover the secrets hidden inside the book she received in Argentum. By reading the hidden story she begins to understand how her omama, Celia, and her opapa, Max, used their magic to escape from the Nazis.

5. Give us an insight into your main character. What does she do that is special?

Miri is a lot like me. She was bullied for being different when she younger, but the experience has made her stronger. Her magic is formidable, but she still struggles to use it effectively. She cares deeply for her friends and Maze of Shadows finds her in a situation where she is isolated from them. (I won’t say too much as I don’t want to spoil it for my readers.)

6. Have you written anything else?

Yep, apart from P.A.W.S. and Argentum I have stories in a number of anthologies including Fauxpocalypse, Darkly Never After, Sins of the Past and Heroes & Villains.

7. What are your ambitions for your writing career?

Just to finish and publish my series and hope that it’s read and enjoyed by a lot of people.

8. Which writers inspire you?

Long list here, but it includes Neil Gaiman, J.K. Rowling, Douglas Adams, Terry Pratchett, Cassandra Clare and Cornelia Funke.

9. When did you decide to become a writer? Why do you write?

Probably “decided” to become a writer when I was about eight years old and wrote a series of school stories in a bunch of notebooks. I write because I’ve always written. I enjoy putting words onto paper and seeing where they lead me.

10. Do you have a special time or place to write?

Not really – with two kids I just fit in the words whenever I have time.

11. Where do you get your inspiration?

I love to sit in cafes and people watch. I get a lot of inspiration from my observations.

12. Do you work on an outline or do you prefer to see where the idea takes you?

I’m mostly a discovery writer. I might jot a few ideas down in a notebook before I write, but mostly I just let the story take me where it will. The only exception is that as I’m writing a series I do keep an up-to-date timeline and character list. Consistency is really important when you have historical events intertwined with fiction.

13. Do you ever get writer’s block? How do you overcome it?

A little. I find going for walk helps. I think better with fresh air and a change of scenery.

14. What is the hardest thing for you about writing?

Not being distracted. The internet and Facebook in particular are dangerous for me. When I know I have something to complete I don’t let myself go on the internet until I’m done otherwise I can waste a whole day that way.

15. How do you market your books? Why did you choose this route?

A combination of stuff online and local events. For example I was part of a fantasy writer’s blog tour in January and will be doing another in June. I’ve also done local book signings at indie bookstores and libraries.

16. How much research do you do?

I research as needed and enjoy the process. For Argentum for example I virtually visited Wales and Ireland, worked out how long it would take an owl to fly across Europe and studied the history of the teabag!

17. Do you write on a typewriter, computer, dictate or longhand?

Mostly directly into my computer, though occasionally I will write stories or chapters longhand on paper while I’m out and the type them up when I return home.

18. What are some of your favorite books/authors?

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to Galaxy, Douglas Adams; All of the Harry Potter series (but particularly book 3); Terry Pratchett’s Thief of Time; The Book Thief by Marcus Zusak; Inkheart, Cornelia Funke; Davita’s Harp, Chaim Potok; Neil Gaiman’s Neverwhere.

19. Are you currently reading any books?

Just finished A Street Cat Named Bob by James Bowen (a birthday present from a good friend who knew I would love it) and currently reading The Blood of Olympus by Rick Riordan.

20. How can readers discover more about you and your work?

Blogs:
Paws4Thought (writing) – https://debbiemanberkupfer.wordpress.com/

Paws4Puzzles (puzzles) – https://paws4puzzles.wordpress.com/

Facebook Author page: https://www.facebook.com/DebbieManberKupferAuthor?ref=hl
P.A.W.S. https://www.facebook.com/PawsInstituteOfTheMidwest?ref=hl

Puzzles: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Paws4Puzzles/255518324584444?ref=hl

Twitter: @CiciCat42
Amazon Author Page: http://www.amazon.com/Debbie-Manber-Kupfer/e/B00DHPNJ5I/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_1?qid=1421944889&sr=8-1

Book Links:
P.A.W.S. http://amzn.com/B00DNJP4UG
Argentum: http://amzn.com/B00OVEA52E

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/7142164.Debbie_Manber_Kupfer

SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT: There will be a $0.99 sale on Argentum Feb 13th-15th!

Author Interview with Johan Fleetwood

Here is an interview with Johan Fleetwood.

1. What genre are your books?

Focus on my books is a combination of soft and hard science-fiction with a lot of elements from fantasy, horror and drama. There is a lot of magic, erotica and blood in my books as the species and societies has gone back to a more primitive living despite their developed senses. Too be a part of nature and accept all living things as one.

2. What draws you to this genre?

I have always loved genres like science-fiction, fantasy and horror. I have loved reading it, writing it and watched movies in these three genres. Probably it is because I am a thinker, a philosophical individual who love to be lost in thoughts and dreams. Being able to creating places and be away from the reality I did not want to be in.

3. What project are you working on at the moment?

My current project is set in the near future, in the megalopolis known as Cypress city placed in Northamkrin. Here there are many different cultures and species from all places around the universe of Romanorum, gathering and living in a beautiful but violent world. The project is called Wave (one of seven military schools the Government set up to train new kinds of troops who will defend Earth from unknown threats).
The Miniseries Wave is one of several miniseries during the Strain age (about year 2065-2085) in the large project Chronicles from Romanorum. As usual, in this miniseries I do not have characters sorted in good and bad sides because all characters have a bad and a good side. Every choice they make is affecting someone somewhere in the city, in a small or big way.

4. What’s it about?

The miniseries Wave is focusing on the conflict between Cyborgs, Superions and Clones. Three different species who think they are the cosmic perfection created in labs during the Past and Future technological eras of Mankind. They all want something for themselves in order to save their own species, but to survive they need help from other species around Amkrin, even from fractions that are scattered around the globe. As the military schools is developing their arts of warfare and training new troops the hatred among the individuals in the major species is growing.

5. Give us an insight into your main character. What does he/she do that is special?

I have four main characters in this miniseries, two males and two females. They have different backgrounds and come from different places with different views on life, which makes them dangerous to each other but they need each other in order to survive the hard reality they are facing.
The female characters are a Nature and a Superion. They accept each other as soon they meet and choose to fight against all evil in order to protect Life and the universe. They are driven by ideas that were created thousands of years ago and never want to change in that way. Their powers are divined and in all way they are greater than anything alive, which gives them many enemies.
The male characters are a Cyborg and a Clone. These two hate each other because of the conflict between their species. They hate each other because they have to and sworn to protect the individuals whom they love the most. Not an easy task because these two individuals are bound to each other and because the outer threats from both common enemies and cultural norms, they need to survive in some way.
It can seem like a lot of clichés when I write about them in this way, but I try to write about their ideas and feelings in a greater picture and how the individual act from these feelings. How they interact with each other and how their different views creates conflict between groups and species, but also creates conflicts within themselves.

6. Have you written anything else?

I have some old stories from my childhood, mostly fan-fictionish stuff and some horror short stories, which I am about to use in my project Chronicles from Romanorum.

7. What are your ambitions for your writing career?

For the moment I just want to write as a hobby and finishing my books in the way I want to finish them, but in the future I want to publish the books and hopefully get some readers that enjoy the universe I am creating.

8. Which writers inspire you?

The writer who has inspired me most is C.S Lewis, the author of Narnia. I have loved Narnia since I was a little kid and still I love the books which are a beautiful combination of the modern era with mythologies and religion in a beautiful world that never seems to fade.

9. When did you decide to become a writer? Why do you write?

It started when I was very young and maybe it has to do with my philosophical part. I did not decide to become a writer; it just came to me naturally. I write because it is a part of who I am and without writing I lose a great part of my identity.

10. Do you have a special time or place to write?

I can write anytime, but I have favorite moments when I write. Mostly it is in the morning or in the evening when my brain is most active. When I am writing it could be in any place, like on the bus, in bed, at my desk in the bottom floor of the house, the library. It doesn’t matter where I am, the most important is that I get the writing done.

11. Where do you get your inspiration?

I have a lot of places in where I can get inspiration. Reading books or having a walk in nature, watching movies, watching pictures of natures and animals, listening to music give me a lot of emotions I can use while I write.

12. Do you work on an outline or do you prefer to see where the idea takes you?

I prefer to see where the idea takes me before I work on an outline. I hate to have a structure for my writing and want to make the worlds to grow by themselves, like a big garden of life and adventures.

13. Do you ever get writer’s block? How do you overcome it?

It happens sometimes. Not often, but it happens. When it does I just try to accept it and let it pass as I do other things I love to do, like watching movies or listening to music. After some days the block has cracked and I can return to my writing. It is all about acceptance.

14. What is the hardest thing for you about writing?

Endings. The hardest thing about my writing is to come up with a great ending that really marks the readers of what really happened and making the reader wanting more of the story. Also, I do not want to write an ending that feels to cliché or something that totally crash the feeling I try to create in my books.

15. How do you market your books? Why did you choose this route?

For the moment, I only have my author pages on FB (one swedish and one english). For the moment when I do not looking for publishing my books, I just take things slow and only talk a little about them and my progress in my writing on these author pages. Things will probably change if I manage to publish the books.

16. How much research do you do?

When I start a book I do not do much research in different subjects, but when I know more about the story and what subjects the book is going to have I start to make a deep dive into books and on the Internet so I can find out as much as possible about that specific subject. For example, it can be cloning, warfare, weapons, aero planes, mythology or religion.

17. Do you write on a typewriter, computer, dictate or longhand?

I write on my laptop and longhand.

18. What are some of your favorite books/authors?

For me I have only two: C.S Lewis and Rosemary Kirsten. They write in an easy and magical way that makes you want more about their worlds and the characters that are living in them.

19. Are you currently reading any books?

For the moment I read The Steerswoman by Rosemary Kirsten, the first book in a fantasy/science-fiction-series about Rowan, a Steerwoman and a truthbearer. You will follow her adventure to find about the truth and origin of magic, the only thing she doesn’t know anything about. On her adventure she meets a lot of danger and different kinds of people, but will be helped by a female Outskirter…

20. How can readers discover more about you and your work?

Facebook: Johan Fleetwood – Author, https://www.facebook.com/pages/Johan-Fleetwood-Author/307802496063576
Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/johanfleetwood

Author Interview with Tom Atwood

I would like to introduce a dear friend of mine, Tom Atwood!

1. What genre are your books?

My current work in progress is urban fantasy, but I’ve written cyberpunk, science fiction, steampunk and mystery.

2. What draws you to this genre?

I am a huge fan of the Dresden Files. I grew up around mystery and sci-fi, so for a while those were the genres I was working on. Then I read Storm Front and absolutely fell in love. Between that, City of Bones, and Supernatural, I started to get really into the genre, and this is my second attempt at the genre.

3. What project are you working on at the moment?

I am working on Dauntless, which is meant to be the first in a long series of novels.

4. What’s it about?

The story is about Kacey Alexander, a young girl who recently went through the tragedy of losing her mother. When she looks through her mother’s belongings, she finds out that her family belongs to a long line of Sentinels, mages who are dedicated to protecting the world from the forces of darkness. Following the threads of her mother’s last investigation, she learns about a conspiracy to plunge humans and the mystical community. Together with her friends, she has to learn to stand against the fear that controls her and save her city.

5. Give us an insight into your main character. What does he/she do that is special?

Kacey is a character of contradictions.  On the surface, she’s the strongest character I’ve ever worked with.  She’s strong, fierce, defiant, and can do almost anything she sets her mind to.  Beneath the surface, though, she’s plagued with abandonment issues, isolation, and pain.  Her mother’s death, and the subsequent discovery that her parents have been lying to her, practically destroyed her psyche, so she’s been trying to put a mask over her pain until she finds a way out.

6. Have you written anything else?

Nothing that’s been published. I’ve written a few short stories and some fan fiction in the past, but this is my first attempt at anything ambitious.

7. What are your ambitions for your writing career?

It depends on the day you ask me, really. Some days I want to top the best sellers list, host panels at comic-con and have the kind of fame that big name writers like Steven King and JK Rowling have, and other days I’ll be happy if I can finish this novel without tearing my hair out.

8. Which writers inspire you?

Oh wow, how long is this interview supposed to go?  I could be here for hours listing all the authors and creators that have inspired me along the way.  I suppose the big three are Joss Whedon, who inspired me to try and weave tragedy and comedy together, Alexandre Dumas, who was the first author who inspired my love of writing adventure, and Jim Butcher, who, as I mentioned, first inspired my love off Urban Fantasy.

9. When did you decide to become a writer? Why do you write?

I first started writing as a means of dealing with my parent’s divorce, kid stuff really, writing down additional adventures for the characters I read about in my illustrated classics. From there I started imagining my own characters, and imagining them overcoming similar obstacles as the ones I face.

10. Do you have a special time or place to write?

Whenever I find time. Mostly on the weekends, but I do write on my lunch hour occasionally.

11. Where do you get your inspiration?

Anywhere and everywhere. The strangest place I’ve ever gotten inspiration from is a very odd swirl of frost that was frozen on my windshield.

12. Do you work on an outline or do you prefer to see where the idea takes you?

I used to prefer just taking off and writing, but these days I’m trying an outline, and seeing what comes of it.

13. Do you ever get writer’s block? How do you overcome it?

I have in the past.  The only way I’ve found to overcome it is just to keep writing, ignore the awful parts that come out, and keep the good.  It is easier in theory than in practice.

14. What is the hardest thing for you about writing?

Finding time is definitely a challenge, but the hardest thing is going back on a piece you’ve written, or someone else reading a piece, and not being happy with the result.

15. How do you market your books? Why did you choose this route?

I haven’t had anything published, but I do have an author page and a blog that are under construction where I plan to feature more information on my books.

16. How much research do you do?

It depends. For items that I have a solid background on, I just do a quick refresher. For items where it’s considerably murkier, however, I bring up anything and everything I can get my hands on. I’ve spent hours before on a single myth or legend, just to make sure I have it right.

17. Do you write on a typewriter, computer, dictate or longhand?

I am useless without the warm, glowing radiation of the computer.

18. What are some of your favorite books/authors?

Jim Butcher, Jack London, JK Rowling, and Alexandre Dumas.

19. Are you currently reading any books?

Yes, I’m currently reading Geekomancy and City of Bones I just finished.

20. How can readers discover more about you and your work?

Blog: http://atwoodtjr.blogspot.com/
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/tatwoodauthor

Author Interview with Daniel Black

I present an interview with Daniel Black!

1. What genre are your books?

A: I write Epic Dark Fantasy.

2. What draws you to this genre?

A: Fantasy and Science Fiction of all sorts have always appealed to me greatly, and as the saying goes, “Write what you read.”

3. What project are you working on at the moment?

A: I am currently working on a second trilogy, as well as a number of standalone novels, all set in my fantasy world of, “New Earth.”

4. What’s it about?

A: The second trilogy is part of an initial trilogy of trilogies I am doing in order to fully explain the origin of my new fantasy universe. This new trilogy is called, “Rise of Dragons.” One of the things my main characters have commented on in my first trilogy is the lack of dragons, this new trilogy will explain their absence, and they will arrive in a very big way.

5. Give us an insight into your main character. What does he/she do that is special?

A: I have a couple of main characters, but two of them appeal to me for completely opposite reasons: Blake “The Hammer” Ingersoll: Blake’s character starts the series as one of my least interesting characters, essentially a jock with little on his mind but fun. His character developed far beyond what I expected over the course of the series, and he developed into a genuine hero.
Michelle Brown: Her character has a substantial background that affects the entire story in far more ways than are ever seen on the page. Her mother and her best friend’s mother were friends before their parents met, and died together in a tragic car accident when Michelle and her friend were small children. This event had a drastic effect on both the characters fathers, the best friends father collapsed in on himself and never recovered, while Michelle’s father essentially tried to turn her into his son. The story begins when Michelle decides to ask her boyfriend to marry her, and buys a very unfortunate wedding band.

6. Have you written anything else?

A: Yes, my first novel was actually a science fiction piece, but I decided not to publish it, and instead have been tinkering with it for years, hopefully, someday, I will consider it ready for publication.

7. What are your ambitions for your writing career?

A: To create a fantasy world that survives me. I intend to bring other authors into my fantasy world so that it becomes a far more complex world than a single author can make it.

8. Which writers inspire you?

A: A lot of them, lol. But in particular, Robert A. Heinlein, Robert Jordan, Isaac Asimov, Terry Goodkind, Edgar Rice Burroughs, Terry Pratchett, Douglas Adams, and I am currently rereading, “The Cleric Quintet,” by R.A. Salvatore.

9. When did you decide to become a writer? Why do you write?

A: I wrote and published my first short story at 9 years old, though after that my life became rather hectic, resulting in a drought of further writing. I write because I must, if nobody bought a single book that I wrote (Oh the horror!) I would still write, though I might not edit if that was the case.

10. Do you have a special time or place to write?

A: Unfortunately, the middle of the night… I don’t know why, but I do my best work from 1 am to 6 am.

11. Where do you get your inspiration?

A. From people. I am one of those annoying people who talk to everyone, and I do mean everyone. When I was a child I would slip out of our apartment and roam the streets of Honolulu, talking to hookers, pimps, homeless people, cops, everyone out in the wee hours for whatever reason. These days I mainly talk to people at Walmart, but still I learn, and still I grow.

12. Do you work on an outline or do you prefer to see where the idea takes you?

A: A little of both. I have a general idea of where each story is going, and occasionally rush through my first draft to have an outline to expand upon, but the characters don’t always follow that outline. I think that’s when the writing is best though, when the author just sits back and observes while the characters write themselves.

13. Do you ever get writer’s block? How do you overcome it?

A: Yes, big time. I generally write through it, though those bits are usually edited out of the final book since they tend to feel forced.

14. What is the hardest thing for you about writing?

A: Publishing. It is easy for me to write, I do it naturally, but putting my thoughts out there for everyone to see? It’s like walking naked through the town square during rush hour. I am always afraid people will think that the views expressed by my characters are my own, I draw from everyone, and the views are decidedly not.

15. How do you market your books? Why did you choose this route?

A: I have yet to formally market my books. My plan as an author was to write and publish three books in eBook and Audio format, and then advertise. My third book is being converted into audio as we speak, so I expect that by March I will be advertising in full force. I will contact bloggers, newspapers, radio, television, anything and everything I can to get the word out about my series.
As far as why I chose this route. One of the things I had always heard was that a fantasy author isn’t considered to be a fantasy author until they have completed their first trilogy, and that the best way to sell a book is to write the next. So I decided to base my advertising plans off that.

16. How much research do you do?

A: A lot, I am on this computer nearly constantly, and a lot of the time I am doing research on the science for my science fiction work, and into fantasy creatures and their origins, powers, and variations.

17. Do you write on a typewriter, computer, dictate or longhand?

A: I use a computer. I have too due to a nervous system disorder that is common in my family that makes writing with a pen painful. I also dictate using dragon naturally speaking, though that sometimes breaks the flow, requiring me to start again.

18. What are some of your favorite books/authors?

A: The authors who inspire me are my favorites, and I enjoy most of their works. Though Jack L. Chalker is a longtime favorite and I left him off the list above, his willingness to ignore the PC crowd and just write is inspiring indeed.

19. Are you currently reading any books?

A: I am currently rereading, “The Cleric Quintet.”

20. How can readers discover more about you and your work?

I am an open book. If you want to find out about me, contact me on Facebook and enjoy.

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AuthorDanielBlack
Amazon Author Page: http://www.amazon.com/Daniel-Black/e/B00E3B9EEA/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0

Book Links:
Book One: http://tinyurl.com/BlackCareful
Book Two: http://tinyurl.com/BlackSaga
Book Three: http://tinyurl.com/BlackGodWar

Author Interview with K. Madill

Here is an interview with the author of “The Stolen Herd.”

Copyright © K. Madill
Copyright © K. Madill

1. What genre are your books?

Fantasy, adventure and unrequited (so far) love.

2. What draws you to this genre?

In fantasy you’re not limited to the norm. Anything can happen. Also, I have a huge amount of love for mythical creatures.

3. What project are you working on at the moment?

I’m working on the sequel to the Stolen Herd. One of my new characters is pretty difficult – a real jerk actually and he’s fun to write because I get to be super mean through him without being an actual villain which is quite enjoyable. I’m really quite happy with it.

4. What’s it about?

Well, for those of you who’ve read the first one, you’ll know that Mandamus and Luco were headed to Azure Caves to seek counsel with the Snowbreths before they journey to the Light Sands. When they arrive, they find that not all is peaceful within this tribe of abominable snowmen and they must deal with that as well as some not so nice situations and folks they encounter along the way.

5. Give us an insight into your main character. What does he/she do that is special?

Mandamus is an orphaned horse who is seeking his herd. He’s very clever but can be a little hot headed at times. All the process of growing up, I suppose. I will give him this: for all his youth and faults, he is a steadfast, loyal horse and would do anything to protect his friends.

6. Have you written anything else?

I have. I have an anthology of short stories that I’ve been putting together as well as several submissions for Canada’s CBC writing contests. I’ve also got an environmental series in the fire and a children’s book I’m looking to get published.

7. What are your ambitions for your writing career?

To not screw up too badly!

8. Which writers inspire you?

So, so, so many. Tolkien who (in my opinion) spawned the genre. Rowling for her pure excellence in storytelling. Fannie Flagg and Marion Keyes who make us all laugh so hard. Sherman Alexie who proves that anyone can do anything, it doesn’t matter where you come from.

9. When did you decide to become a writer? Why do you write?

I decided to tell stories at a really young age. It progressed to angst song writing and terrible guitar playing in my teens to horror writing with a final evolution to fantasy. I write because I just have so many stories clawing at my insides, dying to get out!

10. Do you have a special time or place to write?

I write whenever I can. I work, commute, live, it all eats up precious writing time. I’ll write anywhere. Ferry lineups. I sneak off to write during my lunch hour.

11. Where do you get your inspiration?

That’s a hard one. I think I initially was inspired to write the series I’m working on now because I had read an article about rounding up wild horses in the Brittany Triangle (here in British Columbia). I remember feeling terrible. Horses are such emotional creatures that form strong bonds with one another. When they are captured from the wild and separated, it’s got to be agonizing for them. I read a lot about animal capture, you know – elephants for zoos, killer whales for Sea World, etc. and I don’t understand why humans can’t consider that animals would have emotions such as love for their families or loyalty or heartache. A lot of the things that animals are going through because of man bother me. I feel like we’re not respectful enough to them as fellow citizens of this planet. I think that some people think they’re just here for exploitation.

12. Do you work on an outline or do you prefer to see where the idea takes you?

Outline, outline, outline, plan, chapter outline. I’m a pretty specific planner. I find if I don’t create a structured skeleton, I go off into the random idea wilderness. You don’t want to get caught out there!

13. Do you ever get writer’s block?

Ohhhhhhhhhhhh BIG TIME. Sometimes I ignore the work. Sometimes I edit. Sometimes I write character sketches. I’ve just emerged from a spectacular bout of block. It was pretty frustrating but seems to have passed, thankfully.

14. What is the hardest thing for you about writing?

Grammar, sentence structure…all of it. I don’t find writing easy, in fact, to write a comprehensive story is pretty damn hard at times. It’s a craft. You have to practice, practice and then just when you think you’ve got it…you have to practice some more.

15. How do you market your books? Why did you choose this route?

I am pretty much a huge failure when it comes to marketing. I did a book tour. That’s about it.

16. How much research do you do?

An enormous amount. I only really knew about domestic horses. I was pretty involved in lore and mythology having that been one of my favorite subjects but I was culturally limited there. I did a lot of reading up.

17. Do you write on a typewriter, computer, dictate or longhand?

Longhand and computer.

18. What are some of your favorite books/authors?

Oh, so many! I love Harper Lee’s ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’.  Atticus Finch is probably my all-time favorite fictional character. Of course J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter is first runner up. I love Tolkien and Peter S. Beagle. Lately I’ve been reading Mauve Binchy and Marion Keyes and finding them hilarious.  Fannie Flagg’s work is so endearingly sweet and Sue Townsend’s Adrian Mole series is some of the funniest reading I’ve ever done. I also love Dorothy Allison, HP Lovecraft and Rudyard Kipling. I was addicted to Alexander McCall’s #1 Ladies Detective Agency series when I read it.  I walked around doing my best to have an African accent for days!  I’m extremely varied in my taste. I’ll pretty much read anything you put in front of me. Whether I like it or not…that’s another story.

19. Are you currently reading any books?

I am, right now I’m reading two books, Echoes by Mauve Binchy and Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn.

20. How can readers discover more about you and your work?

They can visit my website K.Madill.com or my Facebook Page.
Blog:  http://kmadill.com/
Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/pages/K-Madill/161159890706088?ref=hl
Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/karai17/
Book Links: http://www.amazon.com/Stolen-Herd-Mandamus-Luco-Book-ebook/dp/B00GBQ9V8O

Tiny Book Review: The Dragonscale by JE Feldman

Thank you so much to Jasmine for such a fantastically detailed book review of “The Dragonscale.” I sincerely appreciate it!!

Subterraneal Jasiland

Media_Dragonscale_Feldman

Quick Summary:

The loosely intertwined stories of Rothgar, the general who is the keeper of the magical amulet known as the Dragonscale, and Aristaria, an orphaned elf from the city of Revelnortk, are at the center of JE Feldman’s The Dragonscale novel. War is breaking out in the world called Arbedenion as the Vampires, led by their evil queen, Gicessa and her diabolical daughter, Valacotayda, join forces with the army of the Black Dragons to take control of the empire. After a ruthless victory that destroys Revelnortk, the vampires seem to have the upper hand, but Rothgar is determined to stop them with the aid of the dragons that he calls forth from the amulet and his plan to rally the races of Arbedenion to form a united front against the dark armies. Aristaria enters the war with the help of an old friend, the warlock Grevinmor, and manages to gather…

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