Author Interview with Victoria Harrison

Please welcome Author Victoria Harrison!

  1. What genre are your books? 

Fantasy

  1. What draws you to this genre? Victoria Harrison

I feel I have more freedom to create and to bend reality; I like the various manifestations of magic.  I grew up reading Fantasy, it’s home to me.

  1. What project are you working on at the moment? 

My current project is in the infant stages of creation, barely an idea and has no name.

  1. What’s it about? 

A young man thrown from the only home he knew must decide to try to return to it, or change the course of everything.

  1. Give us an insight into your main character.  What does he/she do that is special? 

He currently has no special abilities; he’s just in the wrong/right place at the wrong/right time.

  1. Have you written anything else? 

Yes, but nothing published.

  1. What are your ambitions for your writing career? 

I’d love to be a full time writer, but I’ll settle for just having fun.

  1. Which writers inspire you? 

All of them.

  1. When did you decide to become a writer?  Why do you write? 

I started writing when I was twelve, as an escape tactic to bury myself in another world.  I write now because of the joy of creating new things.

  1. Do you have a special time or place to write? 

I prefer libraries, or writing in the middle of the night when the rest of the house is sound asleep and my cat isn’t trying to convince me to ignore his diet.

  1. Where do you get your inspiration?

From pictures and music mostly, or things I see and hear around me.

  1. Do you work on an outline or do you prefer to see where the idea takes you?  

I usually let the idea take me where it wants to go.  Recently I’ve discovered I prefer having some sort of an outline; however barebones it may be.  Even with an outline, I’m willing to let the story go where it wants.

  1. Do you ever get writer’s block?  How do you overcome it? 

Yes.  I perform research to try to get my mind thinking another way, switch to another project/scene, or take a break.

  1. What is the hardest thing for you about writing? 

Finding environments where I can focus for any length of time.  None of the doors to the rooms in my apartment close properly, and my cat has figured out how to mess up my laptop keyboard to the point it requires a reboot, and I have yet to figure out how.

  1. How much research do you do? 

Too much, I use research to procrastinate, and end up on topics that have nothing to do with the projects I’m working on

  1. Do you write on a typewriter, computer, dictate or longhand? 

Computer and longhand.  I often longhand then retype onto my laptop

  1. What are some of your favorite books/authors? 

Terry Brooks, David Eddings, Nicole Conway, RA Salvatore, JK Rowling, Anne McCaffrey, to name a few.

  1. Are you currently reading any books? 

Yes, too many.

Author Interview with Kyle Della-Rocco

Please welcome Author Kyle Della-Rocco!

  1. What genre are your books? Urban fantasy, for the most part. At least, that is what they will be when I publish any books.
  2. What draws you to this genre? I love to think of ways that our world would interact with the fantasy world if they both collided.
  3. What project are you working on at the moment? Way of the Gods will, hopefully, be a trilogy of books about a normal person being thrust into the world of magic, of god’s and having his whole perspective on life turned upside down.10275523_10206748767096543_1675369853676039776_o
  4. What’s it about? See above. Also, though, it is what I think the gods would do if they ever came back. The old gods all had human like characteristics, they had thoughts and feelings same as we do and thus are easier to connect with. It’s a story about their reintroduction into modern society, their frustration at how things have turned out and how they want to rule over us because they think they could do a much better job than we are doing.
  5. Give us an insight into your main character. What does he/she do that is special? My main character at first is an ordinary person. Jeddah Williams is a bookstore clerk, madly in love with his fiancée when his world is made chaotic from the choices his family made in the past and the events that begin to unfold. He has a special connection with Odin, and his all seeing eye, so he gains some prophetic abilities throughout the beginning of the first book in the series. He has trouble controlling what he sees, but he begins to gain a better grasp on his powers as the story progresses.
  6. Have you written anything else? Mostly short stories, about other characters with magical abilities.
  7. What are your ambitions for your writing career? I’m a simple person, and I don’t have many ambitions. I would be happy if just one of my books got published, and that people enjoyed the tales I have written down. I don’t need millions of people reading my stories, but if that happened I would be extremely happy as would any author I’m sure.
  8. Which writers inspire you? Butcher, Bishop, Tolkein and Salvatore are just a few of the many authors of books that I have enjoyed reading.
  9. When did you decide to become a writer? Why do you write? I write for the same reason I think everyone decides to write. I try to pour myself, the feelings I have stored deep down and to share them with the world, albeit in a creative manner.
  10. Do you have a special time or place to write? I love to read at night, when the world is a little quieter and things have settled down.
  11. Where do you get your inspiration? Dungeons and Dragons has given me much of my inspiration, as have many of the games that I have played with the pen and paper system.
  12. Do you work on an outline or do you prefer to see where the idea takes you? If I get stuck, I sometimes will write out a rough outline of what I think could happen. Otherwise, I feel like my fingers are writing the book themselves.
  13. Do you ever get writer’s block? How do you overcome it? Usually I like to read when I can’t think of what to write. Seeing what other people have penned down often gives me inspiration and leads me to new ideas.
  14. What is the hardest thing for you about writing? Editing your writing afterwards can feel tedious, but it’s a necessary process to allow others to understand what you’ve written.
  15. How do you market your books? Why did you choose this route? I’ve only ever used Facebook to market myself, but as I understand it, many other social media sites exist to advertise yourself as an author.
  16. How much research do you do? As much as I need. I do research when I come to an idea that I have no clue how it would work.
  17. Do you write on a typewriter, computer, dictate or longhand? I often fantasize myself sitting at an oak wood desk, tapping away at the keys of a typewriter. However, I use whatever gadget is on hand when inspiration kicks in, either my computer or my tablet.
  18. What are some of your favorite books/authors? I love the Dresden files series because he makes it feel like magic doesn’t come easily. The main character, Harry Dresden, barely scrapes by getting his rent together or affording decent food. Every step of the way, you can feel his struggle, and I admire him greatly for that struggle.
  19. Are you currently reading any books? Jim Butcher’s series, Codex Alera: The Furies of Calderon is what I am reading at the moment.
  20. How can readers discover more about you and your work? Facebook is the best way to find me, as I don’t advertise on any other platforms at the moment. I plan to set up a twitter account as well when I gain more popularity.

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Convocare/

Author Interview with Adele Marie Park

Please welcome Author Adele Marie Park!

  1. What genre are your books?
    I cross genres, writing mainly fantasy, urban fantasy and also love to write horror.
  2. What draws you to this genre?
    I love creating worlds and characters then pitting them against dangers which are not encountered within our everyday realms.
  3. What project are you working on at the moment? P105064009
    I work on several projects at once but currently I am writing the second book of the Edra chronicles. I am also editing the second book of the Suleskerry series.
    It is a fantasy tale set in the fictional world of Edra centralising around the themes of love, betrayal and ancient evil.
  4. Give us an insight into your main character.
    My main character has recently come into his magical heritage, he acts as a catalyst which brings out the deeper magic in others.
  5. Have you written anything else?
    I have written several short stories and a number of novels.
  6. What are your ambitions for your writing career?
    To bring as many readers as possible pleasure when they read my writing. To make them feel like they have escaped into a magical world and left their troubles behind them at least for a little while.
  7. Which writers inspire you?
    Stephen King. Anne Rice. James Herbert. Storm Constantine. David Baldacci. Tolkien. Robin Hobb.
  8. When did you decide to become a writer? Why do you write?
    I was about six or seven and used to create my own worlds where dragons, faeries and selkies lived. I write because to tell a tale which will be remembered and bring peace of happiness to people is my passion.
  9. Do you have a special time or place to write?
    I write in the kitchen with lots of coffee and cigarettes. The time varies because life takes place.
  10. Where do you get your inspiration?
    From watching people in real life, their conversations and actions and I always wonder how they would act in a fantasy or horror setting. Also ancient folk tales are a wealth of inspiration to me.
  11. Do you work on an outline or do you prefer to see where the idea takes you?
    I used to let the idea take me but with experience I now like to write an outline first.
  12. Do you ever get writer’s block?
    I don’t get it very often and I think the reason for this is, if I get stuck, there is always another project I can work on until I feel the time is right to go back to the original.
  13. What is the hardest thing for you about writing?
    When the novel or the story comes to an end, the emptiness after is almost like grief.
  14. How do you market your books? Why did you choose this route?
    I plan to self publish. I have tried the more traditional route of approaching agents and publishing houses but I found the more I read about self publishing the more it appealed to me. I love the idea of marketing our own product. It’s also bout having control over your own writing.
  15. How much research do you do?
    Research can vary according to what novel I am working on but I love to research and can be found scribbling away furiously in notebook after notebook.
  16. Do you write on a typewriter, computer, dictate or longhand?
    I like to write longhand then type it up on my lap top.
  17. What are some of your favourite books/authors?
    Storm Constantine – Stalking Tender Prey.
    Stephen King – The Tommy Knockers.
    Anne Rice – The Vampire Armand.
    Marion Zimmer Bradley – The Mist of Avalon.
    Raymond E. Fiest – Magician.
  18. Are you currently reading any books?
    Beautiful Creatures by Kami Garcia and Margaret Stohl.
    The Finisher by David Baldacci. Crossing Bedlam by Charles E. Yallowitz.
  19. How can readers discover more about your work?
    Blog – firefly465.wordpress.com
    Twitter – twitter.com/Binky567
    Pinterest – uk.pinterest.com/firefly_/
    Facebook – http://www.facebook.com/firefly.fly.14

Author Interview with Sydnie Beaupre

Please welcome Author Sydnie Beaupre!

  1. What genre are your books? Young adult, mostly dystopian, fantasy, and paranormal.

2. What draws you to this genre? It’s the genre I most like to read.author

3. What project are you working on at the moment? I’m working on at least seven projects, the sequel to my novel Dark One is the one that I’m concentrating on the most. It’s called Exodus. The story I’ve written for this anthology is going to be kept a secret! But I will say that it is pretty magical.

4. What’s it about? Exodus is about fallen angels, curses, forbidden love, and a battle between good and evil. The story for this anthology is about…well, it’s about betrayal of course!

5. Give us an insight into your main character. What does he/she do that is special? The main character of my book Exodus is named Khiara. She was born with the purest soul on earth, and is the harbinger of a great battle between the dark and light sides of the fallen angels on earth. She’s special, because when she was born, she was also cursed because of her parents’ foolishness, and that has an effect on her destiny.

6. Have you written anything else? I have written a few novellas that act as prequels to my novel, Dark One. I’ve also written a few short stories, one of which is in an anthology called Forgotten Places and the proceeds all go to Saint Jude’s children’s research hospital. I wrote a children’s book called The Pillowcase Prince, and the proceeds to that all go to Canada Food Banks.

  1. What are your ambitions for your writing career? I’d like to get as many people to read my works as possible. I don’t care about making money as much as I care about sharing my stories.

8. Which writers inspire you? Indie authors everywhere inspire me, and I really can’t name all of them!

9. When did you decide to become a writer? Why do you write? I don’t ever remember deciding to become a writer, to be honest. I just always knew I would be one. I write because to me, it’s like breathing.

10. Do you have a special time or place to write? All of the time, every day; always.

11. Where do you get your inspiration? From every day life mostly, and sometimes my dreams.

12. Do you work on an outline or do you prefer to see where the idea takes you? I do whatever feels comfortable, so sometimes I outline but sometimes I just go with it. I usually know how it’s going to end though.

13. Do you ever get writer’s block? How do you overcome it? Nope, I haven’t experienced it yet.

14. What is the hardest thing for you about writing? Killing off characters! It kills me a little to kill off a character.

15. How do you market your books? Why did you choose this route? I use Facebook, public boards in my community, and word of mouth. I think these are the best ways to get noticed because having only one way to market your books really limits you. This way, I can have an expanded and diverse audience from all over.

16. How much research do you do? I do SO much research, it’s not even funny. It takes a lot of time and effort, but it’s absolutely worth it to have a book that is as realistic as its universe allows.

17. Do you write on a typewriter, computer, dictate or longhand? Computer, all the way. I’m disabled (I have fine motor problems) and it’s just easier for me to type on a computer. I do, however, appreciate the time it takes to write by hand – especially lately because I’ve been having to write exams all by hand.

18. What are some of your favorite books/authors? Tahereh Mafi, Patrick Rothfuss, John Gregory Hancock, Casey Hayes, Mary Shelly, just to name a few 😉

19. Are you currently reading any books? Oh goodness, I’m reading 52 books currently. One of which is by Gena Showalter, Firstlife.

20. How can readers discover more about you and your work? They can contact me on my social media!
Website: www.sydniebeaupre.com Facebook https://www.facebook.com/SydnieBeaupreBooks Twitter: https://twitter.com/authorsydnieb
Amazon Author Page: http://www.amazon.com/Sydnie-Beaupr%C3%A9/e/B00J7UFFUO/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_1?qid=1458317442&sr=8-1
Book Links: http://www.amazon.com/Dark-One-Sorrow-Khiara-Banning-ebook/dp/B010JSKTG2/ref=la_B00J7UFFUO_1_7?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1435534513&sr=1-7

http://www.amazon.com/Forgotten-Places-Josh-Walker/dp/1944621016/ref=asap_bc?ie=UTF8 http://www.amazon.com/Pillowcase-Prince-Sydnie-Beaupr%C3%A9/dp/1518730698/ref=asap_bc?ie=UTF8 Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/7008747.Sydnie_Beaupr_

 

Author Interview with Gary Lee Webb

Please welcome Author Gary Lee Webb!

  1. What genre are your books? Currently zero books completed, but putatively the first will be high fantasy and the second an alternate history centered around AD 1100. My published short stories are 80% fantasy; the rest are science fiction and alternate history. I have also published non-fiction articles on a variety of subjects (three-quarters of my publications are non-fiction).

    GaryAwardsBanquetCrop
    Copyright © Gary Lee Webb
  2. What draws you to this genre? I have been a fan since I was a teenager.
  3. What project are you working on at the moment? 65,000 words into my first novel.
  4. What’s it about?   Originally I intended to start with the character becoming an adult the hard way, with the death of his father and how he deals with it. But I have found I’d rather write the earlier parts of his life. Thus it has become something of a Gebildungsroman (a growing up and education novel). I have been following the life of my main character from the earliest days, through his youth in poverty, past his father’s death, into coping, new experiences, and increasing success and self-assurance. Eventually, I hope to follow him through romance and adulthood. Along the way, he has acquired companions and enemies – such is life.
  5. Give us an insight into your main character. What does he/she do that is special? He is highly educated by his single-parent father, albeit informally and despite poverty. Lack of resources does not stop him: he is very good at coming up with creative solutions with whatever is at hand.
  6. Have you written anything else?   Several other stories: historical fiction, time travel, science fiction in the near future, other fantasy. Lots of non-fiction.
  7. What are your ambitions for your writing career? Three published novels prior to retiring; many more afterwards. I am not expecting to support myself with writing, just supplement the retirement.
  8. Which writers inspire you? L. Tolstoy, J.R.R. Tolkien, U.K. Le Guin, M. Wells, L. Niven
  9. When did you decide to become a writer? Why do you write? 2012. I am a long-time SF/F fan, part of many convention committees, but I never thought I could be an author. I have been a storyteller for a long time. In 2012 someone convinced me after a verbal presentation that I could be published, I submitted and “A Dish Served Cold” was published four months later. “Varg of Two Rings” will be my sixteenth publication. I wish to get much better, and I have been working hard on it, attending authors’ workshops both locally and at WorldCons.
  10. Do you have a special time or place to write? Not really. Solitude helps. So does music (e.g., Celtic, Jazz).
  11. Where do you get your inspiration?   Life, books, gaming, science, history. I have a number of friends and acquaintances who are pushing the limits of technology and science. I have worked on a couple myself, including the NOAO Large Imager (the world’s largest astronomical camera in 1996) and SOFIA (a German / USA airborne astronomical observatory).
  12. Do you work on an outline or do you prefer to see where the idea takes you? I tend to do a rough outline (often only mental), then follow the story.
  13. Do you ever get writer’s block? How do you overcome it? I work on something else.
  14. What is the hardest thing for you about writing? Finding good challenges for my main character; he is brighter than I am.
  15. How do you market your books? Why did you choose this route?   Not Yet Applicable.
  16. How much research do you do?   I love to do research, and I love to share what I learn. I am an avid astronomy fan and have a masters in mathematics, with a love of history and linguistics.
  17. Do you write on a typewriter, computer, dictate or longhand? Usually computer.
  18. What are some of your favorite books/authors? Martha Wells – her Raksura novels. Larry Niven – the Known Space novels. Lois Bujold. Mercedes Lackey. Stanislaw Lem.
  19. Are you currently reading any books? Many
  20. How can readers discover more about you and your work?   Find me at a conference or on Facebook. I am active in Toastmasters International and in the National Storytelling Network. I love the Renaissance Faires; I go to science fiction and fantasy conventions (10 world conventions, many local); I have assisted at cultural and education events.

 

 

Author Interview with Layne Calry

Please join me in welcoming Author Layne Calry!

  1. What genre are your books?

Fantasy, with romance undertones

  1. What draws you to this genre?

I have always loved imagination. I think it’s amazing and the worlds and characters you can build in fantasy. It just floors me every time.

EBOOK_BETRAYALS_150DPI
Copyright © J.E. Feldman’s Fantasy Writers Group
  1. What project are you working on at the moment?

I always have numerous WIP’s because I can’t focus on one. However, at the moment I am working the most on my Song of Saeran Series.

  1. What’s it about?

It’s a fantasy about a young boy who is thrust into a position and role he had not imagined for himself. He learns secrets about himself and others, and he will go on a journey to end the tyranny that runs rampant throughout his land.

  1. Give us an insight into your main character. What does he/she do that is special?

Saeran is not special at first. At first he is privileged and slightly immature. As he grows, though, his care for others encompasses everything else. He shows great strength, mentally, emotionally, physically, and magically. Those that are helping him and even those that aren’t, they are drawn to that about him. They want to help him, show that they too can show kindness and compassion for others.

  1. Have you written anything else?

I have written many things, though at the moment nothing is published.

  1. What are your ambitions for your writing career?

I would love to have my current series as well as a few others I have started, and even some novels I have finished, to be traditionally published. To just have my name in black and white and on paper, it’s just a dream I never thought was even possible to dream about.

  1. Which writers inspire you?

There are so many, honestly, it’s so hard. J.K Rowling definitely. Just her entire story is amazing. How she managed to bring herself up from poverty, as a single mom with an idea she wrote on napkins, I just love it. It is truly awe inspiring. And another one would honestly have to be Stephen King. The funny thing about Stephen King, I haven’t even read many of his books. However, him as just a person and the advice he gives, and the way he sticks to his ideals and just he is an amazing person and author.

  1. When did you decide to become a writer? Why do you write?

I have always written. I really started when I was about twelve or thirteen. I was so angry and depressed and so many things, and I needed an outlet. I found poetry first, and I loved it, and then I found short stories (I’m still not very good at those J) and then in about 2013 I was super depressed, I was trying to get through so many things. I had two small children, and I was just so lost. So I decided that maybe if I could focus on one thing instead of the stressful things that were around me in my own life, maybe I could get better for myself, my children and my husband. So I tried to do NanoWrimo, and that was the first year I actually wrote a full-length novel. I realized then that I can do this, I can be this writer, this author. And I haven’t looked back.

  1. Do you have a special time or place to write?

I honestly don’t, I just write when an idea comes to me, even if it’s on a napkin or receipt paper, though I usually try and carry a notebook with me. I also tend to write more late at night.

  1. Where do you get your inspiration?

Everywhere around me, although the Song of Saeran series, honestly it started as an idea when I heard my four-year-old and my three-year-old playing together, and it just opened up so many potential things.

  1. Do you work on an outline or do you prefer to see where the idea takes you?

I prefer to see where the idea takes me. I do take extensive notes that I keep open when I write. It’s a hard list of plot lines, world building, my characters and so forth. However, I also am trying to write an idea into a book for a friend of mine, and I do use an outline for his. Mostly because he gave me all the ideas I just have to form them into the story.

  1. Do you ever get writer’s block? How do you overcome it?

Oh my gosh, do I ever. Sometimes I can go days, even weeks, with writing nothing. What I try to do is continue to write, even if it’s on the rpg Wolf I’m a part of, or just lists of things, or character sheets. I also tend to refocus if I can. I will watch movies, listen to music, color (I love to color, it’s a guilty pleasure.)

  1. What is the hardest thing for you about writing?

Grammar and Sharing. I hate to share my work because I get it in my head that the person I am sharing with will hate it or tell me to just stop writing, that I’m terrible. And my grammar is atrocious. I’m surprised my editor hasn’t run for the hills yet.

  1. How do you market your books? Why did you choose this route?

I have not had anything published as of yet. However, when I do get published, I will be using all that I can. I will be using twitter, and Facebook, and I will then start an author page and use Amazon platform if my book is on their database. I also plan to do a lot of word of mouth. I live in a very rural town so anything I tell one person, it’s going to get around.

  1. How much research do you do?

It depends on what I am writing about. I collect and covet knowledge so some things that I may write about I already know about. However, if I don’t know something, I do as much research as I need to properly write about what I am wanting to write about. For instance, the Song of Saeran series I took three days and did nothing but research about swordplay and medieval battles and night time battles.

  1. Do you write on a typewriter, computer, dictate or longhand?

I would love to find a typewriter, but at the moment I write on the computer and longhand. Usually when I write longhand I then transcribe it into the computer.

  1. What are some of your favorite books/authors?

There are so many, let me think. Of course the Harry Potter Series by J.K. Rowling, I love The Watcher in the Mist by Norma Johnston, The Percy Jackson Series by Rick Riordan. I also enjoy The King Killer Chronicles by Patrick Rothfuss, and I absolutely love the Redwall Series by Brian Jacques

  1. Are you currently reading any books?

I am beta reading a few books for a couple different authors, and I also plan to reread the Harry Potter series to my boys. We also read bits of the Redwall series at night.

  1. How can readers discover more about you and your work?

I am on both Twitter and Facebook, and I will add more platforms as I grow.

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/laynecalry/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/layne_calry

Published “Betrayals of Another Kind”

Here is the 2016 Fantasy Writers Anthology that we have all been waiting for since Curse of the Heroines last year! Twelve authors and twelve unique betrayals. We present to you Betrayals of Another Kind, available on Kindle and in paperback!

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Copyright © J.E. Feldman’s Fantasy Writers Group

Summary: No one pays attention to the sidekicks, the apprentices, the stable boys, the second class characters, and they’re tired of it. Now the ones considered the heroes will become the victims of betrayal; whether deliberate or accidental, it makes no difference.
See the products of these betrayals in stories by:
Joann M. Shevock, R. Judas Brown, Angel Blackwood, Melissa Robitille, Daniel Eastman, Layne Calry, Gary Lee Webb, Sydnie Beaupre, Adele Marie Park, Kyle Della-Rocco, Michael R. Baker, and Victoria Harrison.

A Five-Star Review: “Outstanding stories with great imagination and plot twists worthy of Rod Serling at his best. Looking forward to seeing full-length works from these writers.”

Author Interview with Daniel Eastman

Please welcome Daniel Eastman!

1. What genre are your books? Most are Fantasy, although I dabble in Science Fiction too

2. What draws you to this genre? The broad scope and potential to tell a variety of stories; to create new worlds with depth and detail.

Author Photo- Daniel Eastman
Copyright © Daniel Eastman

3. What project are you working on at the moment? I have several projects in the works, but the one I’m working on most is the Raven Queen Series Michelle (my wife) and I are writing together.

4. What’s it about? It’s about a Princess that’s been blinded and the Mage that’s promised to protect her as they reclaim and regain her rightful place as Queen.

5. Give us an insight into your main character. What does he/she do that is special? For her, it’s the struggle to not only adjust to a new condition and feel worthy of the devotion others are showing her but to reclaim her throne. For him, it’s discovering not just who he is and what he can do; but why he is important to her and others.

6. Have you written anything else? I’ve had some poetry published in the past, over a decade ago. But, for the most part no. I’m finally venturing out of my shell with this short story.

7. What are your ambitions for your writing career? I have a cookbook I’m working on, there’s the world in which the short story was written…working on editing much of what we have there now, but that story has a long way to go. And there’s the Raven Queen series. I want to finally get my writing out there in the world to be enjoyed as much as I’ve enjoyed it. I’d love for it to be able to support my family too.

8. Which writers inspire you? This is a fairly large list if I put them all down. But, in no particular order: Tolkien, Sanderson, Asimov, Dostoyevsky, Heinlein, C.S. Lewis, Mercedes Lackey are just a few.

9. When did you decide to become a writer? Why do you write? I started writing in second grade, but it was always either a school project or something I did after telling myself a story while doing chores. Writing helps keep my very active mind busy and helps me make sense of my day, failing that it has come to help me relax at days end, sorting my thoughts even if unrelated to what I’m writing.

10. Do you have a special time or place to write? I’m hunting down that special place, at the moment of writing this I’m on my last week in a hotel hunting for an apartment still. As for time, anytime after dinner. I’m definitely a Night Owl, I’ve watched the night spin outside my window into daybreak more than once.

11. Where do you get your inspiration? My wife and I work together often on projects and I like to think we inspire each other. Sometimes we find an image, some artwork, and use it as a jumping off point to base a tale on or around. Of course all that I’ve read has had an enormous impact on where that leads; but when it comes down to it I really don’t know what sparks an idea into existence.

12. Do you work on an outline or do you prefer to see where the idea takes you? I actually do a bit of both. I have some extremely basic points I want to cover and reach, but like an Orienteering challenge there’s always a variety of ways to get to each one.

13. Do you ever get writer’s block? How do you overcome it? Yes, I do get it, but not generally the way it’s thought of. Instead of typically sitting to an empty screen or perusing the internet. It turns into working on a different story than I intended. On the other hand, stress is my biggest enemy…usually simply writing helps, or the text-based RP between Michelle and I on which a lot of our writing is based on.

14. What is the hardest thing for you about writing? Right now it’s finding a safe place to do it. After that it’s a confidence thing. I returned from a mission for my church to discover EVERY thing I’d written before that had been thrown out. For the longest time I stopped writing, stopped doing everything I enjoyed but cooking (which by the way is another way I relieve stress…if I’ve a decent kitchen it pays to be my neighbor)…it took a few years before I started again.

15. How do you market your books? Why did you choose this route? This is something new. I’ve never gone this route, or any route.

16. How much research do you do? Stay off my browser… I’ve devoured entire public libraries. Seriously, I embrace a logical reality to even the most fantastical setting and adding detail to a world. If you can close your eyes and imagine yourself there, from the smell, taste, and other senses and then know where you can go and how to live day to day as if you just left the country then I succeeded in what I hoped for.

17. Do you write on a typewriter, computer, dictate or longhand? I used to do longhand only with some dictation. I just couldn’t type. When I started writing again it was after learning to do text-based RP in AOL chatrooms. After that the only time I pick up a pen is to take notes.

18. What are some of your favorite books/authors? Well, I mentioned authors already…but favorite books of fiction: Roverandum, The Little Prince, Stranger in a Strange Land, Chronicles of Narnia, Silmarillian, Heart of Darkness, War & Peace, Shogun, Elantris and many many others.

19. Are you currently reading any books? Sadly no, I’ve been working on the Dresden Novels though.

20. How can readers discover more about you and your work?

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/d3astmanwriting/

 

 

Author Interview with Melissa Robitille

Please welcome author Melissa Robitille!

  1. What genre are your books?

I write in several genres, including paranormal romance, urban fantasy, space opera, and horror.

Me_02_14_01
Copyright © Melissa Robitille
  1. What draws you to this genre?

I write things I’m interested in, honestly. I write to tell myself a good story, and I enjoy speculative fiction – fantasy, science fiction, horror – because to me the best story ideas start with ‘what if?’

  1. What project are you working on at the moment?

Among other projects, I’m working on F.A.E.: Bitter Roots, first book in the F.A.E series.

  1. What’s it about?

F.A.E.: Bitter Roots is about an outcast elf, her journey from Seelie Court royalist to American revolutionary, and her interaction with the Continental Army and General Washington.

  1. Give us an insight into your main character. What does he/she do that is special?

Mahrial DiSilvanus is stiff, sour, irritated all the time, and has a moral backbone of steel. She has rather poor social skills, despite her experience in the Seelie Court, and is often oblivious to the feelings of others. She is a Sidhe warrior and sorceress, but despite her skill in those areas she shines most when it comes to tactics and investigation.

  1. Have you written anything else?

Yes. I have 2 published paranormal romance novels – In One Year’s Time and Blackstone Gate – that I wrote when I was quite young. I’ve ghostwritten a dozen books which have been published, and I’ve published thirteen additional books under a pen name. My current works in progress include the F.A.E series, the Smuggler series (space opera), and a horror serial Only In Dreams I’m publishing a chapter at a time on Wattpad.

  1. What are your ambitions for your writing career?

It’s nice to dream about being the next J.K. Rowling, but to be honest my ambition is more along the lines of producing a steady one or two books per series per year and have those books generally make somewhere near bestseller list for their category. Modest success doing what I enjoy doing would be quite fine with me.

  1. Which writers inspire you?

Don’t we all say Tolkien? Yes, of course, Tolkien, but also Piers Anthony, Terry Pratchett, Terry Brooks, David Eddings, Tad Williams (I had a complete geek freak moment when he accepted my friend request on Facebook), Terry Goodkind, Robert Jordan, Brian Sanderson, Sharon Lee & Steve Miller, Lois McMaster Bujold, Stephen King, Dean Koontz, Sherrilyn Kenyon, Laurell K. Hamilton, and any number of others.

  1. When did you decide to become a writer? Why do you write?

I really never intended to become a writer as a child – I was quite set upon becoming a fashion designer… or a rock star. However, soon after I married, my husband discovered me writing a story and insisted that I keep going and… well, the whole matter snowballed into two published books and the outline for a third to go with them. Seeing them in print definitely cemented my decision to make being a writer part of my life. Losing my husband two years ago made his ambitions for my writing all the more precious to me.

  1. Do you have a special time or place to write?

I have an office – a very, very cluttered office – with a roll top desk, where I do all my creative work. I work twelve or more hours a day, every day, but I spread the time between editing, book formatting, 3D modeling, creating art one way or another, cover design, and writing on different projects.

  1. Where do you get your inspiration?

Everywhere and nowhere, really. Some inspiration has come from dreams, some from misunderstanding snippets of other people’s conversations (this is occasionally hilarious), some from personal experience, some from just glancing at old cover art. My mind is forever trying to tell me the next story, so for me it’s a matter of filtering all the ideas down into what might actually make a good book.

  1. Do you work on an outline or do you prefer to see where the idea takes you?

I’ve done both, and I’ve settled on a combination of the two. I make a rough outline with plot points that have to happen to get the story to ‘hang’ right, then I go ahead and write – sometimes even the rough outline gets changed, but most of the time the bare bones hold up well enough.

  1. Do you ever get writer’s block? How do you overcome it?

I’ve never had writer’s block for longer than a few days, but when it happens it’s usually because of some enormous upset or tragedy going on in my life. I tend to the issue at hand and get on with life and writing as promptly as I can. I don’t always stick with the same project – I’ll hop from story to story – but I’m always writing.

  1. What is the hardest thing for you about writing?

The Zone. It can be difficult to be left alone long enough to get into “The Zone”, but for me getting out of “The Zone” is nearly impossible – so I wind up unable to stop writing. I think of it like the Hans Christian Anderson story of the red dancing slippers, though thankfully I doubt I’ll type myself to death. I’ve had episodes of writing 36 hours straight. That’s exhausting, believe me, and tends to make the next two days less than productive.

  1. How do you market your books? Why did you choose this route?

Market? I’m honestly a complete flop at marketing. I couldn’t sell wooly mittens in Anchorage. I really need to develop a marketing plan that goes beyond word of mouth and begging for reviews. That’s not to say I don’t try. When I remember to do so I write in my blog, I tweet, I send out Facebook messages, and try to drum up support on Goodreads.

  1. How much research do you do?

Here I shine. Half of my Bachelor’s credits were taken with a mind towards getting a BA in History, so I research extensively – though I did not for my first two books, much to my embarrassment. For F.A.E.: Bitter Roots, for instance, I’ve been researching troop movements and battles of the American Revolutionary War, as well as figures of speech and slang, clothing, ships, and firearms. For my Smuggler’s series I’ve been researching AI, abnormally large crystal growth, blood types, organ transplantation, brain functions, and how politicians divide people and victimize the target (usually smaller) group legally and with the enthusiastic approval of the majority.

  1. Do you write on a typewriter, computer, dictate or longhand?

I write at my computer, usually with Scrivener, though if an idea strikes me while I’m out and about I’ve been known to jot notes on everything from napkins to pizza boxes.

  1. What are some of your favorite books/authors?

I suppose we all say Tolkien for this as well, and while that’s true, I do adore word play and puns, so I enjoy Piers Anthony’s Xanth series and Terry Pratchett’s Discworld series immensely.

  1. Are you currently reading any books?

Yes, I’m reading Endgame: The Calling by James Frey.

  1. How can readers discover more about you and your work?

    Website: http://robitille.wix.com/home
    Blog: https://robitille.wordpress.com
    Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Melissa-Robitille
    Twitter: https://www.facebook.com/Melissa-Robitille
    Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/melissarobitille
    Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/robitille/
    Amazon Author Page: http://www.amazon.com/Melissa-A.-Robitille
    Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/5416508.Melissa_Robitille

 

Author Interview with Angel Blackwood

Please welcome professional author and editor Angel Blackwood!

  1. What genre are your books?

My books all fall somewhere in the fantasy genre.

Angel Blackwood
Copyright © Angel Blackwood
  1. What draws you to this genre?

I like being able to invent my own races, societies, and cultures. I also really enjoy making up magic systems. I feel I can be freer with my plots in a fantasy setting.

  1. What project are you working on at the moment?

At the moment, I’m working on book two of my Obsidian Embers Trilogy.

  1. What’s it about?

It’s a continuation of the struggle between the women with magic in charge and the rebellion of men who have been tortured and experimented on and women who have defected. A war is brewing, anyone could be a traitor, and death is always right around the corner.

  1. Give us an insight into your main character. What does he/she do that is special?

It’s a hard question to answer when you have four of them. Truth be told, my heroes are no more special than anyone else, they’re just standing up for freedom and equality when others won’t.

  1. Have you written anything else?

I’ve written one book in a completely separate series involving a lot more fantasy creatures and magic. I’ve also written several short stories that have been published in anthologies. All of those have differing subject matter.

  1. What are your ambitions for your writing career?

Honestly, I’d love to be as big as some of my favorite authors and inspirations. But I’m just happy for people to read my books.

  1. Which writers inspire you?

Joe Abercrombie, Brent Weeks, and R.A. Salvatore are the three who influence me the most.

  1. When did you decide to become a writer? Why do you write?

I first wanted to write when I was nine. I didn’t try to get serious with it until I was thirteen and a friend suggested writing as a way to help cope with my depression. Now I write because the day feels wrong if I don’t write, and of course it still helps with depression and stress.

  1. Do you have a special time or place to write?

No. I write when I can. I have children so I just make time when I can make it.

  1. Where do you get your inspiration?

My imagination mostly. Sometimes I hear a song or read about something in history that is particularly inspiring though.

  1. Do you work on an outline or do you prefer to see where the idea takes you?

I rarely outline beyond knowing how the book might end and maybe one or two middle pieces. I love letting the story develop organically.

  1. Do you ever get writer’s block? How do you overcome it?

If I get to where it’s hard to write in my novel, I find I’m going about writing the scene the wrong way or I need to take a break and write something completely different. I don’t believe in writer’s block of the sort that stops you from writing altogether.

  1. What is the hardest thing for you about writing?

The hardest thing for me about writing is finding the time to do it when my daughter is up and about.

  1. How do you market your books? Why did you choose this route?

Right now, I market the anthologies on my facebook author page and on some promotional sites as well as through word of mouth. I’ll develop a stronger plan with my agent and whatever publishing house we end up signing with in the future for my novel.

  1. How much research do you do?

I do a huge amount of research on things people probably don’t think need to be researched. My world is invented and it has magic, but I still want the mundane things to be accurate.

  1. Do you write on a typewriter, computer, dictate or longhand?

I write on my laptop.

  1. What are some of your favorite books/authors?

I don’t have a lot of specific books as favorites, more series than anything. I love the Drizzt series from R.A. Salvatore, the First Law Trilogy (and all his stand alone books too) from Joe Abercrombie, Magical Kingdom for Sale series by Terry Brooks, and the Lightbringer Series from Brent Weeks. The few individual books I could read over and over are The Book of Lost Things by John Connolly, The Martian Chronicles by Ray Bradbury, A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle, and any single book by Neil Gaiman.

  1. Are you currently reading any books?

Right now I’m reading Night of the Hunter by R.A. Salvatore.

  1. How can readers discover more about you and your work?

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/angelblackwood13
Twitter: @angelblackwood1
Pinterest: dantea13
Amazon Author Page: http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B00SARZLFY