Author Interview with Strivion Jacobs

Introducing an author from “Forbidden Rites.”

1.                  What genre are your books?

I’m strictly a fantasy writer, and I write what’s called High Fantasy.  It’s when you make up a world from scratch; people, races, religions and so forth.

2.                  What draws you into this genre?

I suppose it’s the freedom.  I can quite literally write whatever I want without being bound to the limitations we have here in real life.

3.                  What project are you working on at the moment?

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Copyright © Strivion Jacobs

At the moment, I’m working on a nine-part series titled, An Anthology of Dreams.

4.                  What’s it about?

Well, in a nutshell, it follows the journey a group undergoes to uncover a conspiracy involving resurrecting the (devil essentially) and stopping a war from breaking out amongst fallen gods and long forgotten darkness. 

5.                  Give us insight into your main character.  What does he/she do that is special?

Without going too cliché, one of the main character’s life (unbeknownst to him) had been completely orchestrated by a divine force, and he is placed into the heart of every conflict that springs up.  I guess you could say that he’s always in the right place at the wrong time!

6.                  Have you written anything else?

That’s a loaded question!  I’ve written loads of stuff, and not all related to my main works!

7.                  What are your ambitions for your writing career?

My greatest wish, is that I can make a comfortable living off of my work.  I’m not talking buku-bucks, but just enough that my wife can quit her job and rely on me for a change.  She holds me up completely, and I would love to take care of her.

8.                  Which writers inspire you?

Well, obviously there’s the great writers…  But I wouldn’t say that they inspire me as much as the struggling writer.  The ones that continue to push on through it all when they can barely make ends meet, and still manage to find that they love their work.  The ones that, despite it all, never give up.  Those are the real heroes.

9.                  When did you decide to become a writer?  Why do you write?

I started by accident, actually.  I was sixteen and I kept having the most vivid dreams.  It’s very rare to have the same dream more than once, but mine seemed to have some sort of chronological order!  Eventually the dreams stopped, but I had enough to go on.  That’s why I called my series An Anthology of Dreams. And I write because it makes me happy. 

10.              Do you have a special time or place to write?

Time: At the last possible minute!  Place: Anywhere that the TV or internet ISN’T!

11.              Where do you get your inspiration?

The majority of my inspiration comes from music.  I wrote my entire first novel listening to a SINGE album.  Iced Earth:  Something Wicked This Way Comes.

12.              Do you work on an outline or do you you prefer to see where the idea takes you?

It starts off as a highly organised detail, and then I usually find that I only use about half it, if that, and take the rest based on how I’m feeling!

13.              Do you ever get writer’s block?  How do you overcome it?

I work on another project.  The best thing, I find, is to keep writing.  Even if it’s not related, it keeps your brain ticking away while you refresh yourself.  Then alternate back and forth as needed.

14.              What is the hardest thing for you about writing?

Probably killing off characters while making sure that either:  A) Their life was meaningful while it lasted.  B) Making sure their death meant something, and effects the reader or the story in a significant way.

15.              How do you market your books?  Why did you choose this route?

Well, I suppose that by marketing, you could mean present. Since I’ve been going the traditional way so far, I always thought it best to present the first third of my anthology to a literary agent all at once.  Meaning that I submit my first novel, and if they like it, I’ve already got several more written and waiting, that way they know I’m dedicated.

16.              How much research do you do?

I spent a great deal of time researching how travelling by horseback actually worked.  The amount of time medieval sea voyages would take to cover oceans, and even how people dealt with oral hygiene way back when.  If you want to make an enthralling experience, you need to get your facts all sussed out first.

17.              Do you write on a typewriter, computer, dictate or longhand?

I like to write my notes by hand, and then jump to my computer.

18.              What are some of your favourite books/authors?

My favourite books are probably Moorcock’s Elric series, David Eddings’ Belgaraid, and Karren Miller’s Kingmaker Kingbreaker series.

19.              Are you currently reading any books?

David Eddings’ Malloreon, the World of Warcraft lore books and I really WANT to read the Malazan Book of the Fallen series.

20.               How can readers discover more about you and your work?

Website/Blog: strivionjacobs.com

Facebook: An Anthology of Dreams

 

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Author Interview with Nicole Cunniff

Introducing an author from “Forbidden Rites.”

1.      What genre are your books?

I write mostly urban fantasy as well as some dystopian fiction.

2.      What draws you to this genre?

I don’t have much interest in non-fiction, I like to get away from reality, even if it is just in my mind and only for a little while. I really like to write stories that have supernatural elements because they stretch the imagination and allow me to believe – however briefly- in the unbelievable.

3.      What project are you working on at the moment?

me
Copyright © Nicole Cunniff

I have 3 novels in the works as well as flash fiction stories that I write weekly for my website. The novel I am currently spending most of my time on is still very much in the beginning stages, and is one of the more difficult things I’ve written.

4.      What’s it about?

It takes place in France (This is part of the difficulty I mentioned), and without going too far into detail, is about a woman who discovers a past life that she lived, in the house she just inherited. Some mystery, some murder, some romance. Should be pretty interesting…I hope.

5.      Give us an insight into your main character. What does he/she do that is special?

My main character in this story doesn’t actually have any special abilities. She is a pretty average woman who decided to accept her inheritance after the relationship she was in became abusive. She is starting fresh, moving to a new country, and starting new friendships. Now, her past life was a bit more intense, she lived in 1600’s France as a witch; her journey to discover this life is a bit of a crazy ride.

6.      Have you written anything else?

The story for the FWG Anthology will be my first published work, but I write frequently none the less. I write a story every week for my website, which I call flash fictions because most of them are between 500-1500 words. I do have a few stories on my website that are short story length that I release in pieces. I also submitted a novelette to a writing contest; which was about a woman discovering another world existed, inhabited by the Fae who took her sister. She went on a journey to rescue her and discovered things about herself along the way.

7.      What are your ambitions for your writing career?

I would say that I strive to achieve what all writers do – success. I want to be able to write for a living; I want to create stories that let people escape from their day to day lives. I want my stories to inspire people like so many writers have done for me throughout the years.

8.      Which writers inspire you?

Wow, there are so many inspiring writers out there that choosing a few is difficult. I do have a hand full that I look up to, Karen Marie Moning would probably be number one on my list. Her series – The Fever Series, is absolute perfection to me. It is a work of fiction, but is so pact full of insight and wisdom that it struck a chord deep within me.  Other inspiring authors are Patricia Briggs, Ilona Andrews, and Kristin Cashore. One thing that I find inspiring in all of these women is the fact that they put quality above quantity. They have no fear of pushing a deadline to make each story the very best it can be.

9.      When did you decide to become a writer? Why do you write?

Well, I’ve always been an avid reader, but to be honest, writing isn’t something that I actually considered until I was out of high school. It was one of those moments where I was debating on going to college and if I decided to go, what would I major in, what would I do with my life? I believe it was a friend, or maybe a relative, who asked me why I didn’t try writing my own stories.

I’m not sure if anyone else has had this happen to them, but it was as if once the idea was mentioned I couldn’t shake it, I knew I had to give it a try. I’ve written little bits since then, started novels and put them aside to start others. It wasn’t until a few years ago that I truly got serious about it though; I started going to college to earn an English degree, wanting to improve my writing and expand my knowledge. Now, I write as often as I can, but probably not as often as I should. My story in this anthology will be my first published, but I hope it won’t be the last.

For me, reading is an escape, and I would say this is a big reason I write as well. Writing the stories that pile up in my head is a way for me to go on a journey, but I also hope that it will provide someone else with a short escape from their ordinary lives as well.

10.  Do you have a special time or place to write?

Honestly, just whenever I have time. I work a full time job, have children, and go to school. Most of the time I find myself writing in the morning on the weekends, and if I write during the week it’s for a very short time before I go to sleep or on my lunch breaks at work.

11.  Where do you get your inspiration?

Is it lame to say the stories just come to me? I’ll find myself thinking about something or other and have this moment of –oh my god, how cool would it be if…

Other times, when I’m actually trying to find something new to write about, I find inspiration in everything around me. Whether that be nature, a show, a book, a day dream, or even pictures and art.

12.  Do you work on an outline or do you prefer to see where the idea takes you?

Short stories that I’ve written tend to be done by just running with the idea. With those, there’s not a lot of planning involved for me and I often get surprised by where the story ends up myself. Since I haven’t actually finished a novel I don’t really have a set process for this yet. I’ve been experimenting with outlining, but I usually get too excited by the story and start writing way ahead of when I should. Most times I have to put the writing aside and do more research before I can continue.

13.  Do you ever get writer’s block? How do you overcome it?

Ugh, yes. It happens often for me. I have this habit of becoming totally obsessed with something and then weeks or months later it fizzles. Though it happens with other interests as well, so it may not be specifically writers block…Maybe creative block?

So when I go through one of my – I’m totally not feeling this right now- phases, I try to just let it ride. I always come back to my writing in the end, and usually have so many new ideas after taking a break.

14.  What is the hardest thing for you about writing?

Finishing a story is the hardest thing for me about writing. I usually end up switching between a few projects because I get stuck on the slow parts, especially in novel length stories. I get bored and always want to get back to writing the action and the drama, which is usually when I switch over to one of my other writing projects.

15.  How do you market your books? Why did you choose this route?

Since I have yet to publish any, I don’t have any insights into marketing yet.

16.  How much research do you do?

I would say that depends on the story. My short stories and most of the small pieces I have posted to my website have little to no research. One of the novels I’m currently working on and mentioned earlier needs quite a bit. Since it takes place in a country I’ve never been to I have to research the land, history, buildings, customs, etc.

17.  Do you write on a typewriter, computer, dictate or longhand?

My computer, so far. I find my handwriting gets too sloppy trying to get my thoughts out on paper. I type much faster than I write, and it makes it easy for editing as well, being able to cut passages and keep them for later if I wish.

I have been toying with the idea of writing a novel longhand to see if it helps me focus more and get rid of distractions. I may just do that with this novel I’m working on based in France.

18.  What are some of your favorite books/authors?

As I sit here and stare at my book shelves I see at least 20 different authors, all of these are books I can’t bear to part with, so choosing favorites are hard. I think I’ll have choose books by those writers I mentioned earlier that inspire me. The Fever series by Karen Marie Moning will always be at the top, the Mercy Thompson books by Patricia Briggs, Kate and Curren books by Illona Andrews, and Graceling by Kristin Cashore to name a few. Harry Potter by J.K. Rowling will always be a favorite as well, I’ve lost count the number of times I’ve read those.

19.  Are you currently reading any books?

Yes! Currently reading the Outlander series by Diana Gabaldon. They are amazing by the way, definitely recommend them!

20.  How can readers discover more about you and your work?

Come check out my website – nicolecunniff.com – I regularly post flash fictions and updates about anything new I’m working on. If you like my facebook page I share all of my flash fictions there as well.

Website: nicolecunniff.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/nicolecunniffwriter/

Author Interview with Diane Drake

Introducing an author from “Forbidden Rites.”

 

1. What genre are your books?

A whole range of urban fantasy to epic fantasy.  I even have a few attempted pieces in paranormal genre of sorts.

2. What draws you to this genre?

I like the thoughts of unknown and exploring their words’ possibilities.

3. What project are you working on at the moment?

Too many to count, but my main line project is an epic fantasy series dealing with the world beyond dreams and the ways different realms could be connected.

4. What’s it about?

Each book leads the six characters to learn about themselves, their hearts, and their family; all the while they try to set the main string puller free of his despair corruption.  To do this they have to travel from realm to realm correcting the culprits’ meddling as they go.

5. Give us an insight into your main character. What does he/she do that is special?

The six main characters each represent a branch of the elemental circle and the typical personalities one might think that come with these elements.  With their combined differences they are able to compliment each other as well as be individuals.  It doesn’t hurt to be able to conjure these elements during battles either.

6. Have you written anything else?

This is my first ‘published’ work, but I do write plenty of other things that are unfinished with grand plans to eventually have them published.

7. What are your ambitions for your writing career?

I would like to get all my work in progresses finished and out in the world.  I’m not in it for the profits.  I rather share a moving story that can hook others to read anything they might have passed up before.

8. Which writers inspire you?

I am more by book person, because I don’t like everything written from a single author.  But having said that, many of the books by Gary Paulson moved me to enjoy reading.  Which lead me into Mercedes Lackey (the Heralds of Valdemar series) and Anne McCarthy (Dragon Riders of Pern series) who both have a tendency to influence my writing.  Though totally off genre, Gena Showalter (Lords of the Underworld series) also helps inspire different character developments for me.

9. When did you decide to become a writer? Why do you write?

I was in eighth grade, and forced to write journals for class everyday.  Each Friday we had a chance to read one of our entries.  I remember that one of my entries got a standing ovation from my English teacher that I admired greatly.  That sparked my interest in my writing ability, but it wasn’t until the standardized tests did I decide to actually pursue it.  Out of the whole school region (across three states) I was the only one to pass the writing portion of the test with a perfect score.  That was a major confidence boost.

Which is the exact reason why I write as well.  I try my best to incorporate a strong message in all my writing with out loosing the fun aspects of storytelling.  I write to hopefully help change minds about reading, or about a situation in life, or provide a comfort so others know they aren’t alone.  Books, including fiction, can be great learning tools if given the proper thought.

 

10. Do you have a special time or place to write?

I wish, but no.  I do attempt to write everyday, but inspiration is a key factor in all my motivations.  If inspiration isn’t there, no words are coming from my finger tips.  And I’ve also learned that even though I do most of my writing at my desk, I’ll do it anywhere I have a note taking app handy or pen and paper.  Folders have become whole chapters before, and napkins an idea map.  It can get a bit out of hand when inspiration kicks in.

11. Where do you get your inspiration?

A lot of my inspiration comes from music actually.  Though its not limited to music.  I’ve had pictures, phrases, games, and even a smell has inspired me before.

12. Do you work on an outline or do you prefer to see where the idea takes you?

I’ve dabbled both routes.  And sometimes I do go back to outlining a bit, but for the most part I’m a ‘by the seat of your pants’ kind of person.  I typically start where I think the beginning is and just keep going through the story.  I see the story as sort of like a movie playing in my head.  If the fast forward button gets stuck, for what ever reason (usually inspiration and coffee combo), I jolt things down in a side notebook/worksheet in a sort of outline format to help me remember later on where my tangent was going.

13. Do you ever get writer’s block? How do you overcome it?

I don’t necessarily call it writer’s block, but I do suffer from lack of inspiration a lot.  And for very long periods of time too.  I still have yet to find a for sure routine to over come it, but I have found that just keeping my mind open to inspiration from all around me, especially daily tasks help.  I came out of a four month stint once just by giving my home a version of ‘spring cleaning’ to the max.

14. What is the hardest thing for you about writing?

Over coming the doubt that what I am writing isn’t complete junk.  With why I want to write a goal to touch people, I deal with the constant fear all I’m doing is throwing out boring words to take up space.  Once that fear has crept in my inspiration usually can’t keep me writing. 

15. How do you market your books? Why did you choose this route?

Wanted to get out there, and this was the first opportunity I had.  I just started looking into getting my foot into the published door, so I am still open to many different ways.  Joining this anthology was just a window to the room of potential.

16. How much research do you do?

Depends on the type of story.  Most of the time I do research as I come across ideas.  If its something I’m interested in I typically can go weeks on a research voyage.  Other times I just look up things for confirmation I’m using them correctly (like weapons and/or vehicles).

17. Do you write on a typewriter, computer, dictate or longhand?

I do a combination of longhand and computer.  But if I ever had an opportunity to use a typewriter I totally would. 

18. What are some of your favorite books/authors?

Seventh Crystal by Gary Paulson, the first book to pique my interest in fantasy world.  Nearly all books by Gena Showalter, Deb Macomber, and Mercedes Lackey.  However I typically will pick up anything at least once.

19. Are you currently reading any books?

Life doesn’t allow me to read like would like. But the times I do, I’ve been re-reading the Lord of the Underworld Series by Gena Showalter.  I like reading things I don’t write, so harlequin is my go to genre for reading.

20. How can readers discover more about you and your work?

Author Interview with Laurie Bis

Introducing an author of “Forbidden Rites.”

1. What genre are your books?

Mainly I find myself writing science fiction and fantasy with dark humor

2. What draws you to this genre?

laurie
Copyright © Laurie Bis

I always enjoyed driving teachers and adults crazy asking “what if?”

3. What project are you working on at the moment?

I’m in the process of creating a space empire with cybertronic vampires

4. What’s it about?

The struggle of a species to survive and the lengths that they will go for a new start

5. Give us an insight into your main character. What does he/she do that is special?

One of my main characters is a scientist who secretly teams with a group of vampires

6. Have you written anything else?

We have notebooks strewn all over the house with scribblings of my different ideas on them.

7. What are your ambitions for your writing career?

I’d like to complete my space vampire series and see it transformed into movies.

8. Which writers inspire you?

Anne McCaffrey, Sir Terry Prachett, E.A Poe

9. When did you decide to become a writer? Why do you write?

Paper is a very sympathetic listener – it never interrupts but will occasionally mock you if you ignore it too long.

10. Do you have a special time or place to write?

I try to write in the dead of night – the house is finally quietish, every creak and sound you hear takes on a whole new meaning.

11. Where do you get your inspiration?

Reading other authors or sometimes just letting my mind drift the strangest thoughts can occur.

12. Do you work on an outline or do you prefer to see where the idea takes you?

I try to write an outline to force my brain to acknowledge the the goal, but find that the characters don’t always do what you expect.

13. Do you ever get writer’s block? How do you overcome it?

Loss of ideas, no – but occasional when my fingers touch the keyboard my brain decides it’s time to play hide and seek with the words that were just there.

I’ve thought seriously of just glueing the suckers there until they behave, but an entire story of asfjkl; variations would be difficult at best

14. What is the hardest thing for you about writing?

Butt glue – I had been using a cheap generic brand that just doesn’t keep my butt in the seat long enough to be productive.

15. How do you market your books? Why did you choose this route?

I’ll be focusing in digital media and word of mouth.  People like to talk and share information.

16. How much research do you do?

I try to write the story first and then focus on the research aspect after.  I find that if I do it the opposite way I distract myself from the goal and spends hours researching the genetic code of a waterbear.

17. Do you write on a typewriter, computer, dictate or longhand?

I use a combination of laptop, speech to text and longhand.

18. What are some of your favorite books/authors?

Terry Pratchett with his Discworld series and Robert Aspirin – loved his various book series

19. Are you currently reading any books?

I’ve currently got  five books that I am in the process of reading.

20. How can readers discover more about you and your work?

Twitter: @BisLaurie

Pinterest: Xiante

 

Author Interview with Layne Calry

Introducing an author of “Forbidden Rites.”

  1. What genre are your books?
    Fantasy, with romance undertones.
  2. What draws you to this genre?
    I have always loved imagination. I think it’s amazing and the worlds and characters you can build in fantasy. There is so much you can do with it, and you can transport yourself to a new world, or make a world that only lives in your deepest dreams and desires real. You can make it real for that moment in time, and every time someone reads it.
  3. What project are you working on at the moment?

I always have numerous WIP’s because I can’t focus on one. However, at the moment I am working the most on two stories. One is a paranormal fantasy/romance called Beyond Dark. And the other is a fantasy called The Witch’s Son.

  1. What’s it about?

Beyond Dark is about a young man and woman who come together rather angrily to help Lyla find her sister Rose. Jamison Foster is my main character and Lyla McHaine is also one. They have to go through some trials and fight the evil that borders their tiny town.

The Witch’s Son is about a young soldier who finds out some secrets of his past, and decides to do what is right. Rather than to do what is expected.

  1. Give us an insight into your main character. What does he/she do that is special?

Jamison is a gruff, cynical man with a magical past. His best friend is his furry mutt Brutis. Lyla is a fiery woman with a penchant for drama, but a heart of pure gold.

Tharan is a soldier in the King’s army. He gets healed by a woman that he is supposed to hate and then she is forced into captivity. He will have to go and find out the secrets that can set him free and her, or let the world spin without his help.

  1. Have you written anything else?

I have written many things. I have a short story published in the FW Anthology about Betrayals. The anthology is entitled Betrayal’s of another Kind. I also have queries out to agents for my Song of Saeran Trilogy. It is a completed trilogy, edited and ready to go.

  1. What are your ambitions for your writing career?

I would love to have my current series as well as a few others I have started, and even some novels I have finished, to be traditionally published. I can’t wait for the day when my novels are published. I love that I have short stories being published, but those novels. That will be the dream.

  1. Which writers inspire you?

There are so many, honestly, it’s so hard. J.K Rowling definitely. Just her entire story is amazing. How she managed to bring herself up from poverty, as a single mom with an idea she wrote on napkins, I just love it. It is truly awe inspiring. And another one would honestly have to be Stephen King. The funny thing about Stephen King, I haven’t even read many of his books. However, him as just a person and the advice he gives, and the way he sticks to his ideals and just he is an amazing person and author.

  1. When did you decide to become a writer? Why do you write?

I have always written. I really started when I was about twelve or thirteen. I was so angry and depressed and so many things, and I needed an outlet. I found poetry first, and I loved it, and then I found short stories (I’m still not very good at those J) and then in about 2013 I was super depressed, I was trying to get through so many things. I had two small children, and I was just so lost. So I decided that maybe if I could focus on one thing instead of the stressful things that were around me in my own life, maybe I could get better for myself, my children and my husband. So I tried to do NanoWrimo, and that was the first year I actually wrote a full-length novel. I realized then that I can do this, I can be this writer, this author. And I haven’t looked back.

  1. Do you have a special time or place to write?

I honestly don’t, I just write when an idea comes to me, even if it’s on a napkin or receipt paper, though I usually try and carry a notebook with me. I also tend to write more late at night or in the early morning.

  1. Where do you get your inspiration?

Everywhere around me. My kids bring me a lot of inspiration. I also take a lot of ideas from visual things. I love fantastical portraits, paintings, drawings, images, all of the above.

  1. Do you work on an outline or do you prefer to see where the idea takes you?

I prefer to see where the idea takes me. I do take extensive notes that I keep open when I write. It’s a hard list of plot lines, world building, my characters and so forth. However, I also am trying to write an idea into a book for a friend of mine, and I do use an outline for his. Mostly because he gave me all the ideas I just have to form them into the story.

  1. Do you ever get writer’s block? How do you overcome it?

Sometimes I can go days, even weeks, with writing nothing. What I try to do is continue to write, even if it’s on the rpg Wolf I’m a part of, or just lists of things, or character sheets. I also tend to refocus if I can. I will watch movies, listen to music, color (I love to color, it’s a guilty pleasure.)

  1. What is the hardest thing for you about writing?

Grammar and Sharing. I hate to share my work because I get it in my head that the person I am sharing with will hate it or tell me to just stop writing, that I’m terrible. And my grammar is atrocious. I’m surprised my editor hasn’t run for the hills yet.

  1. How do you market your books? Why did you choose this route?

I use all that I can. I use twitter, and Facebook. I am working on Amazon author page, as well as chewing on the idea of an actual website. I also plan to do a lot of word of mouth. I live in a very rural town so anything I tell one person, it’s going to get around. My mother is also one of my biggest marketer’s. She tells everyone she meets that her daughter is an author and what the names of my books are. It’s pretty awesome to have such a support system.

  1. How much research do you do?

It depends on what I am writing about. I collect and covet knowledge so some things that I may write about I already know about. However, if I don’t know something, I do as much research as I need to properly write about what I am wanting to write about.

  1. Do you write on a typewriter, computer, dictate or longhand?

I would love to find a typewriter, but at the moment I write on the computer and longhand. Usually when I write longhand I then transcribe it into the computer.

  1. What are some of your favorite books/authors?

There are so many, let me think. Of course the Harry Potter Series by J.K. Rowling, I love The Watcher in the Mist by Norma Johnston, The Percy Jackson Series by Rick Riordan. I also enjoy The King Killer Chronicles by Patrick Rothfuss, and I absolutely love the Redwall Series by Brian Jacques

  1. Are you currently reading any books?

I am beta reading a few books for a couple different authors. I have a huge to read list.

  1. How can readers discover more about you and your work?

I am on both Twitter and Facebook, and I will add more platforms as I grow.

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/laynecalry/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/layne_calry
Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/laynecalry/

Author Interview with Melissa Robitille

Introducing an author of “Forbidden Rites.”

  1. What genre are your books?

I write speculative fiction, which includes fantasy, science fiction, horror, paranormal romance, urban fantasy, and other stories based on ‘what if?’

  1. What draws you to this genre?

    Me_02_14_01
    Copyright © Melissa Robitille

I enjoy imagining entirely different worlds where anything can happen.

  1. What project are you working on at the moment?

I always have several projects going at a time, but my major project is a paranormal romance which is a crossover novella between my Murphy’s Law series and Liz Crowe’s Love Brothers series for a holiday boxed set with Ms. Crowe and a group of other authors.

  1. What’s it about?

Detective Andrew Munroe leaves Mill City with a broken heart and a tarnished record and moves to Lucasville, KY. There he meets Tricia Shelton in unfortunate circumstances – her ex is stalking her, and she needs protection. A little bit of magic can save the day, but can she accept that kind of help – or him?

  1. Give us an insight into your main character. What does he/she do that is special?

Andy is a very good detective, but he’s also got what he thinks of as extremely low-power magic, just a little bit of find-it dowsing. While that’s nothing special in Mill City, out in Lucasville it’s the only magic going.

  1. Have you written anything else?

Yes. I’ve ghostwritten over a dozen books, published fourteen under pen names, and under my own name In One Year’s Time and Blackstone Gate, both paranormal romances, my urban fantasy / alt history story “Dragon’s Eggs Benedict” appears in Fantasy Writers 2016 Anthology: Betrayals of Another Kind, my paranormal romance novelette “Wolf at the Door” appears in Love Potion #9, and my horror short story “After the Clowns” will be appearing in Fat Lip Press’s Black Candy, set to release on Halloween this year.

  1. What are your ambitions for your writing career?

Every writer wants recognition and I’m no different, but my goals for now are to write and publish more stories and books under my own name.

  1. Which writers inspire you?

All kinds of authors inspire me, really. JRR Tolkien, Tad Williams, David Eddings, Lois McMaster Bujold, Eric Flint, David Weber, Isaac Asimov, Ray Bradbury, Orson Scott Card, Stephen King, Dean Koontz, Terry Brooks, Terry Pratchett, Piers Anthony, Sharon Lee & Steve Miller, Laurell K Hamilton, Anne Rice, Anne McCaffrey, Elizabeth Moon, CJ Cherryh, Ernest Hemmingway, Mark Twain, Mary Shelley, Jules Verne, Orson Wells, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle… It’s a list that’s almost inexhaustible.

  1. When did you decide to become a writer? Why do you write?

I started writing when I was 7 – I rather drastically changed the ending to my book report on Danny and the Dinosaur. I decided to be a writer when I was 20 and my husband read one of my story fragments and insisted that I finish the rest of the story so he could read it.

  1. Do you have a special time or place to write?

A special time? Honestly, not really. I’m something of a workaholic, and I’ll put in weeks of 18 to 20 hour days. A special place? Definitely. I have an office and an antique roll top desk.

  1. Where do you get your inspiration?

I get most of my inspiration from dreams and from stories piecing themselves together bit by bit over months or years on the ‘backburner.’

  1. Do you work on an outline or do you prefer to see where the idea takes you?

I’d have to say a little bit of both. I put together a basic framework of the biggest plot points, but if I do more than that it feels like I’ve already written the story and then I can’t write it because I’m bored with it.

  1. Do you ever get writer’s block? How do you overcome it?

Not really. There are times a specific project isn’t cooperating with me, so I’ll write on another project. I can’t think of a time when I couldn’t kick start my writing by doing that or writing on a random writing prompt.

  1. What is the hardest thing for you about writing?

While I’ve learned a lot about marketing this year, I still think that it’s not my strongest suit.

  1. How do you market your books? Why did you choose this route?

I promote my books with my own newsletter, Facebook boosted posts, Facebook promotional groups, Twitter, Pinterest, book review blogs, Facebook parties with games and prizes, newsletter advertisement, backlist cross-promotion with new releases, and cooperative promotion with other authors on their Facebook pages and in their newsletters.

  1. How much research do you do?

Exhaustive! For my The Arcane Line series, which is urban fantasy / alt. history, I do a great deal of research – you can’t bend history without knowing what happened in the first place. For my Murphy’s Law series, which is (I’ve only recently coined the term) paranormal noir, I research things that I worry will have the FBI knocking on my door – poisons, murder methods, crime in general, laws, and law enforcement. For my Smuggler at Large series I research bleeding edge technology and extrapolate how that might advance.

  1. Do you write on a typewriter, computer, dictate or longhand?

I write on my computer, but if I’m not at home I’ll write on anything at all – I actually have most of a story plotted out on a pizza box.

  1. What are some of your favorite books/authors?

Another long list! Easier to name series, really. Lord of the Rings, The Belgariad, The Mallorean, Memory, Sorrow & Thorn, Xanth, Discworld, Foundation, Vorkosigan Saga, Liaden Universe, Pern, Long Earth… oh it goes on, and on, and on.

  1. Are you currently reading any books?

I’m reading two right now. Phil Hore’s marvelous paranormal noir, The Order of THE DRAGON, and Liz Crowe’s gritty contemporary romance, Coach Love.

  1. How can readers discover more about you and your work?

Website: http://www.robitille.com

Blog: http://robitille.wordpress.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Melissa-Robitille-203203153102649

Twitter: https://twitter.com/mahrial

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/melissarobitille

Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/robitille/

Amazon Author Page: https://www.amazon.com/Melissa-A.-Robitille/e/B00A3AZW9Q/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_4

Smashwords: https://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/mahrial

 

Author Interview with Meg Boepple

Introducing one of the authors in “Forbidden Rites.”

1. What genre are your books?  Magical Realism

2. What draws you to this genre? I believe there’s a great deal more to reality than what we can see, touch, and prove scientifically.  I’ve had spiritual experiences that, honestly, are in the realm of “mystical,” but I’m afraid if I try telling people about them they might lock me in the looney bin! Fiction, on the other hand, invites my readers to suspend their skeptical disbelief and come into “my world, my reality.” And honestly, it feels I don’t have a choice! Every time I write something, a bit of that magic – that otherworld dimension – that ultimate power of love and good – always seems to end up in my stories anyway!

megan
Copyright © Meg Boepple

3. What project are you working on at the moment? A romance, working title HORSING AROUND

4. What’s it about? About 30,000 words so far!  Oh, wait, that’s not what you meant.  It’s about Trisha, a young widow with 4 kids, a psychic gift she doesn’t want anyone to know about, and a ranch full of rescue horses she doesn’t know what to do with. Trisha has to choose between the handsome news anchor who reminds her how she fell in love with her late husband for all the wrong reasons, and the stubborn Yankee vet who seems to show up at all the wrong – or maybe right – times.

5. Give us an insight into your main character. What does he/she do that is special? My main character in INTENTIONAL CONSEQUENCES, Jonni Hedley, is one of my favorite people I’ve ever “met” in my head. Jonni is a born healer. She’s inherited a form of empathy or empathic healing and is also studying the science of medicine, which makes for an interesting combination of gifts to say the least! Although she’s an introvert, she has a great capacity for love and is very loyal, which means that she sometimes gets in way over her head because she’s trying her best to help! If there’s anyone in the world you’d want as your BFF, it would be Jonni.

6. Have you written anything else? I’ve got almost two decades’ experience performing live drama/theater, and as a playwright have had the privilege for of my several three-act plays and shorter works to be produced in various churches around the country. I had a monologue published in a national magazine in 2012, and also published 2 Christmas-themed short stories which were included in locally-published anthologies in 2013 & 2014.

7. What are your ambitions for your writing career? I’d love to be able to write and release 2 novels per year, 1 in each of two different series/settings. Unfortunately, right now my boss still expects me to show up for work every day, and the banks and utilities companies still expect me to pay my bills every month, and my three cats expect food every morning and every night, so I don’t get to write – yet – as much as I want!

8. Which writers inspire you? I grew up on Madeline L’ Engle and CS Lewis, and was introduced to JRR Tolkien by my 8th grade English teacher. I’ve also been inspired by the grande dame of Sci-Fi, Andre Norton, as well as Ursula K Le Guin and Marion Zimmer Bradley, who made it “acceptable” for girls (Okay, geeky, nerdy girls) to read spec-fic. My list of current favorite authors is too long to list and I’d leave someone out anyway, so I’ll just say I’m inspired by a plethora of writers with amazing imagination, creativity, and skill!

9. When did you decide to become a writer? Why do you write? I never decided, it just “happened.”  One day I had run out of library books to read so I started my own – I was 8 years old. It was about one of my many, many imaginary friends, a little fawn named “Spotty” who followed me around like Mary’s little lamb and kept me from feeling lonely. I couldn’t believe it when I found out my mom, bless her heart, kept that little story (500 words, self-illustrated to boot) for more than 40 years.  She sent it to me with a box of keepsakes when my husband and I finally bought our first home together. About 15 years ago I started writing short plays for specific themes and audiences, which was very gratifying. It’s really only been since 2011 that I’ve started thinking of myself as a novelist. And why do I write? I suppose because I finally am old enough and secure enough that I don’t mind letting other people know that I’ve got imaginary friends in my head!

10. Do you have a special time or place to write? Nope. I write on my lunch break at work, in my bedroom when I can’t sleep, sitting on the floor in my “writing nook,” on the backs of agendas at meetings – sometimes even dictating into my phone as I drive to work. (Some of these are not as effective as others). When I’m really on a deadline, I head to the local library or the nearest fastfood place with WiFi, so I don’t get tempted by conversations or Netflix.

11. Where do you get your inspiration? I think my most-fully-developed main characters have a little bit of me in them, and a little bit of my dreams (or regrets).  If I had stayed in college as a pre-med student instead of switching to English, what would that have looked like?   Jonni, maybe.  What if I had a ranch full of horses like I wanted when I was in 3rd grade?  Poof, there’s Trisha, the protagonist in HORSING AROUND. What if I had taken the proverbial “road not taken?”  So many possibilities, alternate realities so to speak.

12. Do you work on an outline or do you prefer to see where the idea takes you? I seem to know the beginning VERY clearly, and I usually know what the ending looks like before I start. But getting from inciting incident to climax is always a very organic experience, full of interesting side roads and “Hm, I didn’t know THAT when I started chapter 1!”

13. Do you ever get writer’s block? How do you overcome it? I usually write/compose on the computer, using Scrivener and trying not to self-edit as I type.  My biggest problem is usually finding time to write, not what to write. But occasionally I do get stuck. When I do it’s either because (a) I’ve realized I don’t have the skills right now to do what I want to do, or (b) I am missing something that my character needs to tell me.  If it’s (a), I start a different project, one with no pressure or expectations, to hone my craft. If (b), od fashioned “pen and paper” often gets me unstuck. I’ll write stream of consciousness or something totally random that might be character backstory, or some scene that’s (apparently) not part of the actual narrative,

14. What is the hardest thing for you about writing? Believing in myself.

15. How do you market your books? Why did you choose this route? Just starting out in the promotion/marketing/business part of the journey.

16. How much research do you do? Depends on the project!  But it’s all grist for the mill.  What feels like a ‘rabbit trail’ today might end up in a different project 2 years down the road.

17. Do you write on a typewriter, computer, dictate or longhand?  Mostly computer.

18. What are some of your favorite books/authors? Question 8.

19. Are you currently reading any books? ‘Wonderbook’ by Jeff Vandermeer, a historical by one of the members of my crit group entitled ‘Cheat the Wind,’ and re-reading some of the Valdemar books by Mercedes Lackey.

20. How can readers discover more about you and your work?  Nothing official yet.