Author Interview with Robin Leemann Donovan

1. Introduce yourself! What is your experience with writing?

Starting out as an English teacher, I always wanted to write a book. There was never time. Years later, after owning an ad agency for over a decade and having less time than ever, I found myself in a unique situation. I was blogging about menopause. My blog, Menologues, had been picked up by a couple of public service websites, so there was something of an audience. At the same time, my ad agency signed on a new client – a publishing company. So, with a built-in audience, the ear of a publisher and the fact that I was surrounded by talented designers and promoters, the time would never be more ideal. Thus was born: The Donna Leigh Mysteries.

2. How do you select the names of your characters?

First I decide on the roll they will play. My core characters tend to be well-balanced. They are my most relatable characters and while they are serious, they also have a well-developed sense of humor, never taking trivial things too seriously. I always have someone in mind when I’m building a character, so I try to choose a name that person would like – a name fitting that individual. My French characters typically get French names, and sometimes I even ask the person I’m envisioning what they would like their character to be named. Most of the men choose their own first name and their mother’s maiden name. The women generally give it a bit more imagination.

My more two-dimensional characters, the ones that are ludicrous to the point of being caracatures have equally ludicrous names and physicalities. My favorite character is Clovis Cordoba Seville, and she is the complete opposite of any of my core characters; she takes herself completely seriously which makes her completely laughable. And that kind of sums up my philosophy of life.

3. How many hours a day do you write?

I usually write on weekends, and I typically write for 8 hours a day. I can do 6 hours, but less than that is typically not productive.

4. What was your hardest scene to write?

I had written a scene featuring a rural, native Nebraskan. I was trying to give this individual an accent that was lacking in sophistication. That was hard. My editor sent me a note saying “what happened to this guy? Two sentences in and he’s a Harvard grad.” How did I miss that? Trying to rewrite this scene was incredibly difficult. I almost had to invent an accent and I had to keep adjusting my writing from Harvard to corn field without inserting a southern twang – which for some reason kept trying to push itself into the mix. I’m still not 100% sure I captured this speech pattern – but it’s a whole lot better than when I started.

5. What one thing would you give up to become a better writer?

I’ve already given up 100% control. Finding a good editor is critical, but you have to give them some control so you’re not shooting down all of their suggestions – and you really want to.

6. What is your favorite childhood book?

Everything Dr. Seuss and Eloise at Christmastime.

7. What is the most difficult part of your artistic process?

Keeping myself from writing the ending immediately after I’ve written the beginning. With murder mysteries, once you set the stage initially you’re always obsessing about the ending. I have had to force myself to break my books into four equal segments. I don’t allow myself to write the ending until I’m writing the fourth quarter.

8. Do you believe in writer’s block?

I believe that if I force myself to write when I’m not in the mood – it will not be productive. As long as I’m in the mood nothing can block me.

9. Do you view writing as a kind of spiritual practice?

Writing is absolutely spiritual. It’s possibly the only thing in my life where I can enthusiastically agree that my work is good and never doubt it. I think that’s because I feel as though it doesn’t really belong to me – I am merely the conduit. I find it very humbling, which is kind of ironic when you consider I just said my writing is good.   

10. Where can readers learn more about you?

Website.

Bozell Website.

Amazon.

Facebook Author Page.

Donna Leigh Mysteries on Facebook.

Author Interview with Jenna Greene

Q: Introduce yourself! What is your experience with writing?

My name is Jenna Greene. I live in Lethbridge, Alberta (Go Canada!) and I teach at D.A. Ferguson Middle School. I primarily write Young Adult.

Q: What’s your favorite under-appreciated novel?

The True Confessions of Charlotte Doyle by Avi. That novel is brilliant!

Q: What does literary success look like to you?

Having someone read my work and either laugh or cry or gasp.

Q: How many unpublished and half-finished books do you have?

I have a few that are in the cue, waiting to be published. I have no half-written books, but I have a lot of ideas that I haven’t got on paper yet.

Q: What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book?

I don’t do a lot of research, since I can create a lot of fantastical worlds, creatures, etc in my head. If I do research, it is usually on the spot, checking architecture or a term. When I write a sequel, I do reverse-research, where I double-check all the little details of world-building from the first novel.

Q: Do you Google yourself?

Sometimes. I probably shouldn’t.

Q: What is the most difficult part of your artistic process?

Editing. I love writing and, while I’m quite good at editing, it just isn’t as fun. And I sometimes have trouble cutting scenes, even if they need to be cut.

Q: How long on average does it take you to write a book?

About 4-6 months, depending on how busy I am. Since I’m a teacher, I have summers off, so I can get a lot of writing down during July and August. I don’t write much in September, December, or June.

Q: If you could tell your younger writing self anything, what would it be?

That everything I write won’t be gold, but that’s ok. It’s all part of the learning process.

Q: Where can readers learn more about you?

They can check out any/all of these links:

www.jennagreene.ca

www.facebook.com/jennabutrenchukgreene

@jgreenewrites

Author Interview with Dora Esquivel

Q: Introduce yourself! What is your experience with writing?

My experience with writing started when I was in 4th grade and kept writing in journals. Now I have volumes of journals that can get stories from.

I also wrote many technical and educational documents for my previous jobs.

Q: How many unpublished and half-finished books do you have?

Close to 20

Q: What’s the best way to market your books?

Facebook right now, but I see Pinterest as a better source for marketing, more reach more visual.

Q: What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book?

I research names, origins, science, space, theories, history etc.…Oh and porn.

Q: If you didn’t write, what would you do instead?

I’ve done so many jobs, but weight trainer or physical trainer.

Q: What one thing would you give up to become a better writer?

Time.

Q: Do you believe in writer’s block?

Not so much, but do believe in procrastination block.

Q: What is your favorite childhood book?

Nancy Drew

Q: Does your family support your career as a writer?

Yes, they do.

Q: Where can readers learn more about you?

Pinterest.
Blog.
Twitter.
Amazon.

 

 

Author Interview with David Barton

Q: Introduce yourself! What is your experience with writing?

I’ve always loved writing since I was little. The earliest story I can remember was about a boy who travelled to the moon. He watched passing rocket ships going to all the other planets but none to the moon to save him. Now thinking about it, it wasn’t very accurate. After that my stories got longer and when I hit my twenties I got into it seriously, planning on making it a career. Now ten years later I have my first published novel and working hard on the sequel.

Q: What is the most difficult part of your artistic process?

I can think of two parts. The first is actually sitting down and doing the writing. Once I get started it’s very hard to stop but it’s that initial, sit down and block everything out. I often write and watch something on the television. Which isn’t very productive.

The second part is writing emotionally important scenes. The need to get it right, to invoke such emotions in the reader. However, the awesome feeling of nailing one of those scenes is the best feeling.

Q: How many hours a day do you write?

That can vary. Unfortunately I’m not a full-time writer, yet. So on weekdays it can go from 30mins-2 hours. But, on my days off when I’m by myself I do writing days. They tend to involve going out of the house and away from distractions. Writing outside when the weather permits it and treating myself to a subway for the hard work.

Q: Do you hide any secrets in your books that only a few people will find?

I have put in influences in my books but I don’t think I’ve slipped in any secrets. Maybe one or two in-jokes with close friends.

Q: Do you read your book reviews? How do you deal with bad or good ones?

I’ve had a few friends read my stuff early on and they’ve had some great words to say about it. Only gotten two real reviews since my first book got published this June. So that has been good. But I’ve always been able to respond to criticism. I’ll just have to wait and see when I get a bad review in the future.

Q: Do you believe in writer’s block?

Absolutely. Sometimes everything just gets stuck and you can’t find a route to the other side. Any time I’ve been hit with writer’s block I’ve switched books, switched genres. Just to start over and keep things fresh. Then I would go back to the original book. Probably why it took me so many years to finish off.

Q: Does a big ego help or hurt writers?

I think that it would hurt a writer. It would make them miss the little things. Believing that they are too good to bother checking and checking again. A little ego is fine as long as it isn’t taken too far.

Q: What is your writing Kryptonite?

That most definitely has to be the television. Find it so easy to get distracted. Need to get a study with no distractions.

Q: Do you try more to be original or to deliver to readers what they want?

I try to write what I enjoy more than what I feel the reader wants. That way my stories will be written better. I try to put as much originality into my books as I can. That way the reader won’t feel like they’re just reading a re-hash of something they’ve read before.

Q: Where can readers learn more about you?

I have a Facebook page.

I have a profile on my publishers website.

And I have my own site.

 

Interview with Sai Marie Johnson

Q: Introduce yourself! What experience do you have with writing?

Hey! It’s my pleasure to introduce myself: I’m Sai Marie, am a hybrid author; which means I am both represented by a publisher (Blushing Books) and have an indie imprint and production company, InfinityxCreations that I release other books from, as well.

I have been published since July 2013 and have 11 titles available. (I had fourteen but three novellas got condensed and released as one complete novel, so that brought the number down.)

I have an MFA in Creative Writing for Entertainment from Full Sail University and write in multiple genres such as fantasy, sci-fi, contemporary, romantic suspense, romance and poetry. I also write adaptations for screenplays and scripts, so my writing expertise is quite diverse.

Q: What was an early experience where you learned that language had power?

I am Bilingual and I learned the value of language at an early age. When I first encountered another language being spoken in grade school I was upset that I couldn’t communicate with the people speaking.

People who seemed intriguing and fascinating and possibly could become my friends. I felt a draw to the Hispanic culture from a young age due to this and approached many non-English speakers until I finally bridged the gap by learning Spanish.

Q: What is the first book that made you cry?

That is going to be an odd answer, but I have to admit it was the Bible. I began reading it at a small age because of the fantastic battles and middle eastern influence that the Bible speaks about.

The first story I read that made me cry was the story of Esther, also known as Haddassah, who married the King of Persia and broke protocol to save her people from genocide. I think what Esther did in the story speaks leaps and bounds because she was in love with the King and could have been killed for going against the kingdom’s laws in order to save her people, a people that the Persians disliked and Esther had to hide from her husband. Since, he didn’t know she was actually a Hebrew she outed herself at the risk of death and her people still being annihilated. I was about ten when I read that and it truly brought me to tears.

Q: What’s your favorite under-appreciated novel?

I really love this one story I read with my sister entitled, Whispers from the Grave by Leslie Rule.

It’s really incredible and slightly futuristic. The mystery as it unravels is incredible and I’ve re-read the book so many times yet find very few others who have also read it. I highly recommend it to those who love family mysteries with a sci-fi twist.

Q: How many unpublished and half-finished books do you have?

Approximately twenty, though this question is a little hard for me to answer. I have full franchise concepts that I’ve only just begun writing the first book for. I also have a full-length novel that is presently about 15k from being finished but a rough estimate would be 20 books in various stages.

Q: Do you believe in writer’s block?

Yes and no. I’ve experienced it and trained myself over years of self-discipline on how to keep writing and make it happen. I will say, however, that words that come on their own are much more intriguing than those squeezed from the fruit of one’s imagination. That doesn’t mean the juice is any less satisfying, however, just a bit more laborious to acquire.

Q: How did publishing your first book change your process of writing?

I became much more serious about my passion and talent once I became published and had a brand and actual readers to service. Like most aspiring authors, I didn’t take my writing as seriously prior to becoming a truly published author. Now, that I am no longer aspiring and have obtained my goal, I must meet and produce content and quality stories to keep my audience engaged. So, becoming published made me more professional and career-minded about my stories.

Q: What are common traps for aspiring writers?

Disbelief and laziness. What I mean by that is this, if you know you have the best story possible or the next big thing, and you write half of it but never get to the finish line you will never become more than an aspiring writer. If you do not believe in your work nobody else will. It’s a simple fact, that confidence sells so believing your story IS the next Hunger Games or Harry Potter or Fifty Shades of Grey is what keeps you motivated and others believing that it is that next big thing.

Q: If you could tell your younger writing self anything, what would it be?

DON’T BUY INTO THE BULLCRAP! It’s not just a hobby. You were born to write. That’s why your English teacher told you so at the age of fifteen. Believe it. You are a natural-born writer.

Q: Where can readers learn more about you?

Readers can find me at on Amazon or Facebook.

 

Author Interview with Katie Holland

  1. Introduce yourself! What is your experience with writing?

I’m a wife, step-mom, daughter and sister. I have a huge sweet tooth and I love popcorn! I’m fairly new to the author world but I’ve been writing since I was six years old. My elementary school had a writing program where we had to write something every day and that led to my love of writing. I write Young Adult and Romance novels. I currently have three books with a small publisher that will all be out by the end of October with more to come.

  1. What is the first book that made you cry?

The Outsiders. We had to read it in eighth grade. The day we started it in class I took it home to finish it and I cried like crazy.

  1. Do you think someone could be a writer if they don’t feel emotions strongly?

I think so, but it would depend on the genre. I feel that your own emotions are part of the book so the stronger you feel something you’re writing the stronger your readers will feel it as well.

  1. What are common traps for aspiring writers?

Writing what they think people want to read. You have to write for yourself above anything. If you like it so will someone else.

  1. What was an early experience where you learned that language had power?

Probably when I was in the first grade. I didn’t really talk in school until a little boy in class touched my hair. I didn’t like it and I told him in no uncertain terms to leave my hair alone, and he did. That was my first experience with the power of language.

  1. What’s your favorite under-appreciated novel?

This is really hard for me to answer. I’ve read and loved so many books it’s hard for me to choose, but I think I’m going to go with Existence by Abbi Glines. It was the first book of hers I read and it made me a life-long fan.

  1. How do you balance making demands on the reader with taking care of the reader?

For me this means taking the reader on a journey they might not expect but still giving them something familiar that they can relate to. It also means having a good ending that is satisfying for both me and the reader.

  1. What does literary success look like to you?

I’d love to be able to make a good living from my writing. But above that I want to develop a fan base that reads my books and says, “I can’t wait for the next book!”.

  1. What’s the best way to market your books?

I think word of mouth is the best. Having someone like your book and telling their friends they have to read it means the world to most authors. Other than that social media is pretty good. There’s a great community of authors and readers out there that love to read new authors and share what they read.

  1. Where can readers learn more about you?

You can find my author page on Facebook at Katie Holland Author and my reader group is Katie’s Books (And Other Awesome Stuff). I love Instagram so feel free to check out my account @katiehollandauthor.

Author Interview with Nancy Miller

  1. Introduce yourself! What is your experience with writing?

Hi, I’m Nancy E. Miller, author of romantic suspense novels Crystal Unicorns, Shark Bait, and the first in the Alice Gentry series, Desperate Overtures. I find that, as I go, the novels are becoming more suspenseful and the romance takes a second seat. I live near St. Louis, MO, with my husband of 33 years and four very spoiled rescue dogs. My degree is in Sociology and Psychology. I’ve worked with troubled teens, Alzheimer’s patients, and as a case manager, educator, and crisis counselor with the severely mentally ill.

 

  1. What is the most unethical practice in the publishing industry?

The emphasis on profit margin over good literature. The big publishers appear to only want the manuscripts that they can place in certain demographics and genres. The rest of us self-publish because we love what we do. The second would be promising more than you can/plan to deliver for your forty percent. Many small publishers start out talking big plans but, ultimately, the author ends up doing all the work.

 

  1. What is the first book that made you cry?

I think it was Jane Eyre, which is still my favorite novel. It is the ever enduring trope of the battle to overcome circumstances and, ultimately find peace and happiness.

 

  1. Do you try more to be original or to deliver to readers what they want?

It seems that if I wanted to give readers what sells the most, I would write loads of hot sex in all my books. But I don’t. I explore the psychological aspects of my characters. I add a touch of humor to break up the suspense, which I feel adds to the roller coaster ride. I want to be true to myself and my characters.

 

  1. What other authors are you friends with, and how do they help you become a better writer?

I have too many to mention without forgetting someone. We group together, support each other, and learn from each other. To my knowledge, I don’t know any big-time authors, just the ones plugging along like me.

 

  1. What authors did you dislike at first but grew into?

Dickens, Hemingway…all the ones I was forced to read in school but didn’t have the maturity to understand.

 

  1. How did publishing your first book change your process of writing?

I learned that editing never ends. No matter who you pay or however times you read it, someone will call you out on an editing error. I also learned I hate marketing for the most part, not the interviews, but the daily posting and hoping.

 

  1. What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book?

I get the story down first as a 25 page or so treatment/synopsis. That way I know where I want to go and what I need to look up. In Desperate Overtures, the camper was an important part of the story. So I looked over different camper layouts and drew up the camper I wanted on graph paper. The camper and story had been mulling around in my brain for quite some time as fuel for daydreams.

 

  1. How many hours a day do you write?

It depends. Life interferes at time. I tend to write in binges…days of my subconscious ruminating over ideas and then POW I start writing. I tend to see the work as a movie in my mind…dialogue/emotional content first, then visual imagery.

 

  1. Where can readers learn more about you?

I am an avid animal rescue advocate. All four of my current dogs are rescues, from a long line of cats and dogs before them. The eldest, Coco, our pitty/lab, saved us after our house burned down with our six dogs and two cats inside. I can deal with the material loss. Insurance covered that. But the loss of my babies left me inconsolable. I include dogs, and sometimes cats, in my books. They reveal much about the protagonist. I trust my dog’s judgement. As the saying goes, “If my dog doesn’t like you, good chance I won’t.”

https://nancyemiller.wordpress.com/

 

Author Interview with J Raven Moon

  1. Introduce yourself! What is your experience with writing?

Hello, I’m Raven. It has had its challenges, but just like a baseball player, I struck out a few times, but I got up and dusted my ass off. Then had some curve balls thrown my way and hit a few fouls, but now I’m sliding into home. Striking out now is NOT an option.

  1. Does writing energize or exhaust you?raven moon logo

Both.

  1. What is your writing Kryptonite?

The voices in my head won’t shut up until I write.

  1. Do you believe in writer’s block?

Yes, so very much.

  1. How long on average does it take you to write a book?

I can finish one in 2 months if life lets me.

  1. What is the most difficult part of your artistic process?

Believing in myself.

  1. What one thing would you give up becoming a better writer?

Social Media time.

  1. Do you read your book reviews? How do you deal with bad or good ones?raven moon

Yes, I do. I learn from them, unless it is just a plain mean one, then I go off somewhere and cry.

  1. Have you read anything that made you think differently about fiction?

Nope.

  1. Where can readers learn more about you?

 

Google + https://plus.google.com/u/0/+RavenMoonAuthor

Amazon amazon.com/author/ravenmoon

Twitter https://twitter.com/ravenmoonauthor

Goodreads https://www.goodreads.com/RavenMoonAuthor

Facebook-Personal Page https://www.facebook.com/AuthorRavenMoon

Author Page https://www.facebook.com/RavenMoonAuthor/

Readers Group https://www.facebook.com/groups/ravensreadersgroup/

Raven’s Wings (street team) https://www.facebook.com/groups/rravenswings/

Blood Rose (ARC/BETS team)https://www.facebook.com/groups/RavensBloodRose/

Pinterest https://www.pinterest.com/blackravenmist/

MeWe https://mewe.com/i/raven.moon

Website authorravenmoon.com

Instagram https://www.instagram.com/rravenmoon/

Linkedin https://www.linkedin.com/in/raven-moon-/

AllAuthor https://allauthor.com/profile/ravenmoon/

Authorgraph https://www.authorgraph.com/authors/ravenmoonauthor

Tumblr https://www.tumblr.com/blog/superdragonmoonstuff

Rainelle Sterling grew up in the Smoky Mountains, so when she returned home, she made plans to visit the place where she spent her childhood.

What was supposed to be a fun relaxing weekend away with her brother, and friends changes as she learns her grandmother’s tales weren’t tales at all, but a warning as she faces a devastating loss, a fight for her life against the unimaginable.

When faced with telling her parents, she learns things that she never knew. Will the broken trust, betrayal and deceit from loved ones break her? Can she remain strong to survive? If only she knew then, what she knew now, maybe, just maybe, things would be different. But for now, she must fight to stay alive while she plans her revenge against the unthinkable..

TBR https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/40032844-immortal-hearts

Pre-order https://books2read.com/ImmortalHearts

Blog tour sign up https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1ipq5GRo-smoJaCPqkPnFQcmDGFC4_jBk1hX9tJw12JA/

Releasing August 25th

Published with Kingston Publishing Company

Trailer https://video214.com/play/IPz9AfcI38490GWYMIBShg/s/dark

Author Interview with Nicole Highland

 

  1. Introduce yourself! What experience do you have with writing?

My name is Nicole Highland and I’m an author from Fort Wayne, Indiana in the United States. I work full time as a graphic designer, and enjoy writing as a hobby. My first book, Sweetest Release will be released August 24. I started writing in my early teens; I mostly wrote poetry, but also wrote some fanfiction stories as well.

 

  1. What is your favorite childhood book?

I don’t think I could narrow it down to just one single book, but when I was a kid, I loved anything Dr. Seuss!

 

  1. What does literary success look like to you?

To me, literary success the ability to create a story that readers can easily relate to and enjoy.

 

  1. How many unpublished and half-finished books do you have?

Right now, I have 3-4 story ideas I haven’t started on yet, and one that I’ve started.

 

  1. What’s the most difficult thing about writing characters from the opposite sex?

Much like in real life, it’s all about figuring out what makes them tick!

 

  1. Have you read anything that made you think differently about fiction?

I can’t say I have. I’ve always enjoyed fiction, and I don’t think that will ever change.

 

  1. Do you read your book reviews? How do you deal with bad or good ones?

Since Sweetest Release is not out yet, it’s too early to say how I will handle it, but it’s received some nice early feedback from my ARCs, and I’m feeling pretty good! At the end of the day, I try to keep in mind that not everyone is going to like my work. Even New York Times bestselling authors can get some pretty hellacious reviews sometimes, so I know I certainly won’t be immune to criticism either. Some criticism can also be a beneficial tool for me going forward with my writing.

 

  1. What was your hardest scene to write?

By far, the fight scenes were the hardest for me to write in Sweetest Release, since I’ve never been in a physical fight before!

 

  1. Does your family support your career as a writer?

Without a doubt, they have been very supportive of me, and I’ve been thankful for that.

 

  1. Where can readers learn more about you?

Readers can learn more about me at my website www.nicolehighlandwrites.com. I’m also on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook.

 

Author Interview with Pandora Spocks

  1. Introduce yourself! What experience do you have with writing?

I’m Pandora Spocks, and I write literary erotic romance. I’m a sassy ginger and hopeless romantic, living my happily ever after in South Florida. I LOVE reading and writing literary erotic romance.

My ‘spicy vanilla’ books include a three-novel epic erotic romance/law drama called RANNIGAN’S REDEMPTION. Set in New York City, it’s the story of hot-shot bad boy Manhattan attorney Michael Rannigan, and his complicated relationship with Maggie Flynn, the smart red-haired lawyer he hires straight out of law school to join his elite practice.

In addition to RANNIGAN’S REDEMPTION, I wrote a naughty little romantic novella, JUST ONE NIGHT.   At 99¢, it’s the cheapest Caribbean vacation you ever loved. And CHASING ORDINARY is the modern-day adult fairy tale I’ve always wanted to write.

I am the also the author of the Dream Dominant Collection, a series of light BDSM stand-alone novels featuring sexy Alpha males and the strong red-haired submissives who can’t resist them. Currently, the Collection includes LUKE & BELLA, LOST & BOUND, FOR SPARROW, and the newest one, WARRIOR MINE, but more are in the works. Since they’re stand-alone novels, you can read them in any order. Each one is completely self-contained.

Permit me a tiny happy-dance moment—FOR SPARROW, Dream Dominant Book 3 is the 2017 New Apple Medalist in Literary Erotica, but it was just named a 2018 Golden Flogger FINALIST for Best BDSM Book (BDSM Light). Okay, I’m good now. 😊

 

  1. Does writing energize or exhaust you?

I think sometimes it can be both energizing and exhausting. There are times when I feel like I’ve spent all day writing and just poured myself out. But other times, when the plot or some dialog takes an unexpected turn and it feels like the story is coming together, it can feel incredibly energizing.

 

  1. Do you think someone could be a writer if they don’t feel emotions strongly?

Can someone be a writer if they don’t feel emotions strongly? I wouldn’t say no. I just think it would be a different kind of book.

 

  1. If you could tell your younger writing self anything, what would it be?

I would tell my younger writing self to just start. Don’t wait, don’t put it off, take the chance.

 

  1. What authors did you dislike at first but grew into?

I’m not generally a fan of paranormal/fantasy like vampires and werewolves, but I read A.M. Manay’s She Dies at the End for a review and was utterly hooked. It’s not my go-to genre, but her November Snow trilogy is fantastic, and she has a new series out called Hexborn, and I’m loving that as well.

 

  1. How do you balance making demands on the reader with taking care of the reader?

I try to think of myself as a reader, what I appreciate from other authors. I don’t think readers like to be babied. I think we can explore a topic without dumbing it down, and we can trust the reader to keep up.

 

  1. What do you owe the real people upon whom you base your characters?

I suppose I should thank them for being themselves, and for allowing me to borrow from their personalities. And I need to thank Michael Rannigan from East Brainerd Elementary School for the use of his name in my Rannigan’s Redemption trilogy, LOL.

 

  1. What does literary success look like to you?

For me, literary success is putting out books that I’m satisfied with, and that end up being meaningful to other people. I get emails from readers who have been deeply touched by my work, and that’s immensely more gratifying than an award or a best-seller status. It wouldn’t suck to sell enough books to pay the bills, though, LOL.

 

  1. What’s the best way to market your books?

I think that making personal connections with readers is the best way to market romance books. I’m all over social media every day, and I do a lot of takeover parties on Facebook. If I can make a connection with a reader and they read just one of my books, odds are they’ll be interested enough to try another one.

 

  1. Where can readers learn more about you?

My website is PandoraSpocksAuthor.com, and you can find all kinds of information there. I would also invite you to subscribe to my bi-monthly newsletter, Pandora’s Box Unleashed.

I’m on Facebook and Instagram every day, and I’d love for you to join my Facebook group, Pandora’s Passionista Paradise—it’s a great group and we have lots of fun. The Passionistas always hear everything first.

Here are a few more places you can find me as well. And just between you and me, you can read RESISTING RISK, the first book of the Rannigan’s Redemption trilogy, in its entirety and for FREE at both Book+Main Romance Bites and Bellesa.

 

Twitter: https://twitter.com/PandoraSpocksWP
MeWe: mewe.com/i/pandora.spocks
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/PandoraSpocksAuthor
Book+Main Romance Bites: https://bookandmainbites.com/users/18186
Bellesa: Porn for Women: https://bellesa.co/story?id=216/rannigans-redemption-1-resisting-risk
Amazon: http://amzn.to/2u03Gcm
BookBub: https://www.bookbub.com/profile/pandora-spocks
Authorgraph: https://www.authorgraph.com/authors/PandoraSpocksWP